Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296431
Title:
Site Investigation of Underground Storage Tank Contamination
Author:
Hebert, Kevin D.
Affiliation:
Water Resources Associates, Inc., Phoenix, Arizona 85018
Issue Date:
21-Apr-1990
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
New regulations concerning the management of underground storage tanks (USTs) have resulted in increased awareness of environmental contamination resulting from leaking USTs. The objective of the typical underground storage tank investigation is to determine if any subsurface contamination has occurred as a result of tank or product line leakage, fuel spills or overfills. Soil contamination at underground storage tank sites is usually discovered during the removal and replacement of USTs. Techniques that can be used to detect the presence of soil contamination adjacent to existing USTs include soil vapor analysis, exploratory boring, and soil and ground water sampling. The lateral and vertical extent of contamination must be determined at any site which contains detectable quantities of contamination. Two common methods for determining the extent of contamination are over-excavation and borehole drilling and sampling. Boring design and location considerations include number of borings, borehole depth and spacing, and site sub -surface conditions. Differentiation between perched sub -surface water and aquifers is critical. Once an appropriate boring plan has been established, then a sampling and analysis plan must be adopted that meets the needs of the particular investigation. The determination of the extent of contamination at an underground storage tank site is the first step leading to site closure and remediation.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSite Investigation of Underground Storage Tank Contaminationen_US
dc.contributor.authorHebert, Kevin D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Associates, Inc., Phoenix, Arizona 85018en_US
dc.date.issued1990-04-21-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractNew regulations concerning the management of underground storage tanks (USTs) have resulted in increased awareness of environmental contamination resulting from leaking USTs. The objective of the typical underground storage tank investigation is to determine if any subsurface contamination has occurred as a result of tank or product line leakage, fuel spills or overfills. Soil contamination at underground storage tank sites is usually discovered during the removal and replacement of USTs. Techniques that can be used to detect the presence of soil contamination adjacent to existing USTs include soil vapor analysis, exploratory boring, and soil and ground water sampling. The lateral and vertical extent of contamination must be determined at any site which contains detectable quantities of contamination. Two common methods for determining the extent of contamination are over-excavation and borehole drilling and sampling. Boring design and location considerations include number of borings, borehole depth and spacing, and site sub -surface conditions. Differentiation between perched sub -surface water and aquifers is critical. Once an appropriate boring plan has been established, then a sampling and analysis plan must be adopted that meets the needs of the particular investigation. The determination of the extent of contamination at an underground storage tank site is the first step leading to site closure and remediation.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296431-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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