Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296423
Title:
Perils of Progress - Hydrogeological Hazards in Las Vegas Valley, Clark County, Nevada
Author:
Katzer, Terry; Brothers, Kay
Affiliation:
Department of Research, Las Vegas Valley Water District, Las Vegas, NV 89153
Issue Date:
15-Apr-1989
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The prehistoric Indian population in Las Vegas Valley found abundant water for their needs from springs flowing from the base of numerous fault scarps throughout the valley. The faults are generally considered to be compaction faults caused in part by subsidence resulting from dewatering aquifers as the climate became dry and warm during the interglacial periods of the Pleistocene. The valley's aquifers, for historical purposes, eventually reached steady state conditions which lasted through nearly the first half of this century. Urban growth then created a demand for water that was satisfied by overdrafting the ground-water system, which reactivated subsidence. Today, subsidence effects cover about 1,000-1,300 km² of the valley and the maximum vertical displacement is about 1.5 m. As the demand for water continued to increase with population, large imports from the Colorado River via Lake Mead provided abundant water, which helped create additional hazards: a rising shallow water table, resulting from over irrigating landscapes (secondary recharge), intersects land surface in places in the central and eastern part of the valley creating a hazard to structures and facilities; the potential increases in liquefaction; and, the potential for degradation of the deep aquifers from downward percolation of the poorer quality water from the shallow system.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePerils of Progress - Hydrogeological Hazards in Las Vegas Valley, Clark County, Nevadaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKatzer, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrothers, Kayen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Research, Las Vegas Valley Water District, Las Vegas, NV 89153en_US
dc.date.issued1989-04-15-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe prehistoric Indian population in Las Vegas Valley found abundant water for their needs from springs flowing from the base of numerous fault scarps throughout the valley. The faults are generally considered to be compaction faults caused in part by subsidence resulting from dewatering aquifers as the climate became dry and warm during the interglacial periods of the Pleistocene. The valley's aquifers, for historical purposes, eventually reached steady state conditions which lasted through nearly the first half of this century. Urban growth then created a demand for water that was satisfied by overdrafting the ground-water system, which reactivated subsidence. Today, subsidence effects cover about 1,000-1,300 km² of the valley and the maximum vertical displacement is about 1.5 m. As the demand for water continued to increase with population, large imports from the Colorado River via Lake Mead provided abundant water, which helped create additional hazards: a rising shallow water table, resulting from over irrigating landscapes (secondary recharge), intersects land surface in places in the central and eastern part of the valley creating a hazard to structures and facilities; the potential increases in liquefaction; and, the potential for degradation of the deep aquifers from downward percolation of the poorer quality water from the shallow system.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296423-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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