Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296420
Title:
Occurrence of Enteric Viruses and Parasites in Reclaimed Wastewater Used for Irrigation in Arizona
Author:
De Leon, Ricardo; Naranjo, Jaime E.; Rose, Joan B.; Gerba, Charles P.
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology and Immunology and of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
Issue Date:
16-Apr-1988
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The State of Arizona recently implemented virus and parasite standards for discharge and reuse of effluent. This study monitored for two years the enterovirus and Giardia content of reuse effluent from several Arizona wastewater treatment facilities. All treatment facilities met the restricted access irrigation virus standard of 125 enteric virus/40 L, but most plants would have to upgrade their treatment for open access year -round reuse which has a 1 enteric virus/40 L standard. Up to 43% of samples from facilities with primary treatment and oxidation ponds were positive and exceeded 1 enteric virus/40 L. Also, 27% of secondary (activated sludge) effluent samples, which were sand filtered and disinfected by ultraviolet light, were positive and exceeded the 1 enteric virus/40 L standard. Plants using sand filtration and /or chlorine disinfection of activated sludge effluent had the fewest positive samples (20% positive and only 12.5% exceeded 1 enteric virus/40 L). Parasites are monitored for presence or absence in recommended volumes. Giardia monitoring is required for effluent intended for food crop irrigation or full body contact recreation categories.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOccurrence of Enteric Viruses and Parasites in Reclaimed Wastewater Used for Irrigation in Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Leon, Ricardoen_US
dc.contributor.authorNaranjo, Jaime E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRose, Joan B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology and of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1988-04-16-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe State of Arizona recently implemented virus and parasite standards for discharge and reuse of effluent. This study monitored for two years the enterovirus and Giardia content of reuse effluent from several Arizona wastewater treatment facilities. All treatment facilities met the restricted access irrigation virus standard of 125 enteric virus/40 L, but most plants would have to upgrade their treatment for open access year -round reuse which has a 1 enteric virus/40 L standard. Up to 43% of samples from facilities with primary treatment and oxidation ponds were positive and exceeded 1 enteric virus/40 L. Also, 27% of secondary (activated sludge) effluent samples, which were sand filtered and disinfected by ultraviolet light, were positive and exceeded the 1 enteric virus/40 L standard. Plants using sand filtration and /or chlorine disinfection of activated sludge effluent had the fewest positive samples (20% positive and only 12.5% exceeded 1 enteric virus/40 L). Parasites are monitored for presence or absence in recommended volumes. Giardia monitoring is required for effluent intended for food crop irrigation or full body contact recreation categories.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296420-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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