Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296383
Title:
Storm Runoff and Sediment Production After Wildfire in Chaparral
Author:
Hibbert, Alden R.
Affiliation:
USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Lab, ASU Campus, Tempe, Arizona 85287
Issue Date:
27-Apr-1985
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Stormflow and sediment production increased greatly after a wildfire on three small cha3parrlal watersheds in .entral Arizona. Peaks frequently exceeded 5 m³ s⁻¹ km⁻² (450 cfg mi⁻²) when 15-minute rainfall intensity exceeded 50 mm hr⁻¹ (2 in hr⁻¹) on catchments that, before burning, responded little to intense rainfall. Source water for the flashy spates and heavy erosion was surface runoff on the severely burned, unprotected, water -repellent soils. For a few years after the fire, intense summer rains produced a disproportionate amount of the runoff and sediment. Early postfire recovery was rapid; severe flooding and erosion were over in 3 years, and within 5 to 10 years stormflows and peaks declined to near prefire levels. Postfire conversion to grass on one watershed did not appreciably change the rate of recovery.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStorm Runoff and Sediment Production After Wildfire in Chaparralen_US
dc.contributor.authorHibbert, Alden R.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Lab, ASU Campus, Tempe, Arizona 85287en_US
dc.date.issued1985-04-27-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractStormflow and sediment production increased greatly after a wildfire on three small cha3parrlal watersheds in .entral Arizona. Peaks frequently exceeded 5 m³ s⁻¹ km⁻² (450 cfg mi⁻²) when 15-minute rainfall intensity exceeded 50 mm hr⁻¹ (2 in hr⁻¹) on catchments that, before burning, responded little to intense rainfall. Source water for the flashy spates and heavy erosion was surface runoff on the severely burned, unprotected, water -repellent soils. For a few years after the fire, intense summer rains produced a disproportionate amount of the runoff and sediment. Early postfire recovery was rapid; severe flooding and erosion were over in 3 years, and within 5 to 10 years stormflows and peaks declined to near prefire levels. Postfire conversion to grass on one watershed did not appreciably change the rate of recovery.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296383-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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