Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296368
Title:
Microbial Quality of Gray Water for Reuse
Author:
Rose, Joan B.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Weimer, Bart C.; Silverman, Rod S.; Gerba, Charles P.; Sinclair, Norval A.
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Issue Date:
19-Apr-1986
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
As the scarcity of water and the price of municipal water inevitably increase, gray water reuse may become an inexpensive and viable alternative for such purposes as irrigation, lawn maintenance and water closet flushing. However, some problems do exist. The microbial and chemical content of gray water includes agents that may present public health problems. The purpose of this study was to determine the general microbial composition of gray water using standard plate counts and selective media at specific sites (shower/bath, wash cycle and rinse cycle of a clothes washing machine) and the general chemical and physical properties of gray water at these same sites (phosphate, ammonia, chloride, pH, TDS and turbidity). Samples were taken from a diverse group of families with and without children (1 ½ - 9 years). Standard plate count bacteria ranged from 10⁵ to 10¹⁰ colony forming units (CFU)₄/100 ml. Shower and bath water contained an average of 10⁴ to 10⁶ CFU/100 ml of coliforms. Failies with children produced wash cycle gray water containing 10⁶ CFU /100 ml of fecal coliforms. Ammonia concentrations varied proportionally with bacterial concentrations while phosphate varied inversely with bacterial growth. Bacterial numbers increased one order of magnitude during storage of gray water.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMicrobial Quality of Gray Water for Reuseen_US
dc.contributor.authorRose, Joan B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Gwo-Shingen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeimer, Bart C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilverman, Rod S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSinclair, Norval A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1986-04-19-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractAs the scarcity of water and the price of municipal water inevitably increase, gray water reuse may become an inexpensive and viable alternative for such purposes as irrigation, lawn maintenance and water closet flushing. However, some problems do exist. The microbial and chemical content of gray water includes agents that may present public health problems. The purpose of this study was to determine the general microbial composition of gray water using standard plate counts and selective media at specific sites (shower/bath, wash cycle and rinse cycle of a clothes washing machine) and the general chemical and physical properties of gray water at these same sites (phosphate, ammonia, chloride, pH, TDS and turbidity). Samples were taken from a diverse group of families with and without children (1 ½ - 9 years). Standard plate count bacteria ranged from 10⁵ to 10¹⁰ colony forming units (CFU)₄/100 ml. Shower and bath water contained an average of 10⁴ to 10⁶ CFU/100 ml of coliforms. Failies with children produced wash cycle gray water containing 10⁶ CFU /100 ml of fecal coliforms. Ammonia concentrations varied proportionally with bacterial concentrations while phosphate varied inversely with bacterial growth. Bacterial numbers increased one order of magnitude during storage of gray water.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296368-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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