Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296111
Title:
The Growth and Survival of "Naturally-Occurring" Bacteria in Well Water
Author:
Stetzenbach, L. D.; Yates, M. V.; Gerba, Charles P.; Sinclair, N. A.
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
Issue Date:
7-Apr-1984
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Ground water is an increasingly significant source of potable water that has traditionally been considered safe for human consumption without treatment. Although routinely monitored for the presence of coliforms, information concerning the non-coliform bacteria present in well water has been largely ignored. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the ability of non-coliform, "naturally-occurring" bacteria to increase in number and persist in unamended well water. Water was collected from 19 continuously pumping wells throughout the Tucson basin and stored at in situ well water temperatures. Bacteria were enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy at predetermined intervals over a 30-day period. Greater than 3 log increases in bacterial numbers were noted after 24 hours of incubation. Maximum numbers were achieved after 3 days followed by a gradual decline ranging from 0.39-1.84 logs. Non-coliform, opportunistic pathogens have been isolated from Tucson well water. Their increase in number and survival in well water may impact the quality of untreated drinking water.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Growth and Survival of "Naturally-Occurring" Bacteria in Well Wateren_US
dc.contributor.authorStetzenbach, L. D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYates, M. V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSinclair, N. A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1984-04-07-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractGround water is an increasingly significant source of potable water that has traditionally been considered safe for human consumption without treatment. Although routinely monitored for the presence of coliforms, information concerning the non-coliform bacteria present in well water has been largely ignored. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the ability of non-coliform, "naturally-occurring" bacteria to increase in number and persist in unamended well water. Water was collected from 19 continuously pumping wells throughout the Tucson basin and stored at in situ well water temperatures. Bacteria were enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy at predetermined intervals over a 30-day period. Greater than 3 log increases in bacterial numbers were noted after 24 hours of incubation. Maximum numbers were achieved after 3 days followed by a gradual decline ranging from 0.39-1.84 logs. Non-coliform, opportunistic pathogens have been isolated from Tucson well water. Their increase in number and survival in well water may impact the quality of untreated drinking water.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296111-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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