Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296106
Title:
Implementation of Isotope Subroutine to Computer Program PHREEQE and their Application to C-14 Ground Water Dating
Author:
Cheng, Song-Lin; Long, Austin
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Isotope Geochemistry, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
Issue Date:
7-Apr-1984
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The age of ground water is defined as the length of time the water has been isolated from the atmosphere. Among the methods for ground water dating, C14 is the most commonly used and the most intensively studied tool. The concentration of C14 in dissolved inorganic carbon can change as a result of chemical processes in nature, hence, an adjustment factor Q is included in the age equation. A = QAo(e^(- λt)) Various models have been proposed to account for this adjustment factor. Among those models, the mass transferbalance approach is the most rigorous method. Wigley, Plummer, and Pearson (1978) formulated a mass balance equation to calculate the evolution of C13 and C14 in natural water systems closed to soil CO2 gas. Deines, Langmuir, and Harmon (1974) used a set of dual chemical-isotopic equilibrium equations to calculate changes of C13 in systems open to soil CO2 gas. This study implements these two models as a subroutine and adds carbon isotope mixing equations to PHREEQE (Parkhurst, Thorstenson, and Plummer, 1980), which is a computer program for general hydrogeochemical calculations. With this program package, it is now possible to simulate the evolution of chemical and carbon isotopic compositions, including C14, of ground water from open to closed systems. These simulations allow much improved inferences of Q factors for radiocarbon groundwater dating.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleImplementation of Isotope Subroutine to Computer Program PHREEQE and their Application to C-14 Ground Water Datingen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Song-Linen_US
dc.contributor.authorLong, Austinen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Isotope Geochemistry, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1984-04-07-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe age of ground water is defined as the length of time the water has been isolated from the atmosphere. Among the methods for ground water dating, C14 is the most commonly used and the most intensively studied tool. The concentration of C14 in dissolved inorganic carbon can change as a result of chemical processes in nature, hence, an adjustment factor Q is included in the age equation. A = QAo(e^(- λt)) Various models have been proposed to account for this adjustment factor. Among those models, the mass transferbalance approach is the most rigorous method. Wigley, Plummer, and Pearson (1978) formulated a mass balance equation to calculate the evolution of C13 and C14 in natural water systems closed to soil CO2 gas. Deines, Langmuir, and Harmon (1974) used a set of dual chemical-isotopic equilibrium equations to calculate changes of C13 in systems open to soil CO2 gas. This study implements these two models as a subroutine and adds carbon isotope mixing equations to PHREEQE (Parkhurst, Thorstenson, and Plummer, 1980), which is a computer program for general hydrogeochemical calculations. With this program package, it is now possible to simulate the evolution of chemical and carbon isotopic compositions, including C14, of ground water from open to closed systems. These simulations allow much improved inferences of Q factors for radiocarbon groundwater dating.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296106-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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