Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296104
Title:
Stormflow Analysis of Chaparral Conversion of Small, Central Arizona Watersheds
Author:
Alberhasky, Jo Ellen; Hibbert, Alden R.
Affiliation:
Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287; Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Tempe, AZ
Issue Date:
7-Apr-1984
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
A stormflow analysis was done on streamflow records from low density chaparral watersheds, located in central Arizona, that had been converted from brush to grass to determine the effect of vegetation manipulation on stormflow parameters. The Hewlett-Hibbert hydrograph separation technique was used to separate streamflow into quickflow (flashier response) and delayed flow (more controlled response). Differences in quickflow and delayed flows between treated and untreated watersheds were tested statistically by using covariance techniques based on paired watersheds. The results of the stormflow analysis showed that the conversion of brush to grass increased both quickflow and delayed flow about 30 percent. When this increase was based on an average stormflow it resulted in about a 0.04 inch rise in quickflow and a 0.01 inch rise in delayed flow. Brush to grass conversion affected the complete range of streamflows measured although the larger flows were more variable. The 30 percent increase in the quick and delayed flow components suggested that: 1) conversion produced a uniform rise in the stormflow hydrograph as opposed to affecting any single parameter, and 2) as such, produced no major changes in the runoff patterns.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStormflow Analysis of Chaparral Conversion of Small, Central Arizona Watershedsen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlberhasky, Jo Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHibbert, Alden R.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentArizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287en_US
dc.contributor.departmentRocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Tempe, AZen_US
dc.date.issued1984-04-07-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractA stormflow analysis was done on streamflow records from low density chaparral watersheds, located in central Arizona, that had been converted from brush to grass to determine the effect of vegetation manipulation on stormflow parameters. The Hewlett-Hibbert hydrograph separation technique was used to separate streamflow into quickflow (flashier response) and delayed flow (more controlled response). Differences in quickflow and delayed flows between treated and untreated watersheds were tested statistically by using covariance techniques based on paired watersheds. The results of the stormflow analysis showed that the conversion of brush to grass increased both quickflow and delayed flow about 30 percent. When this increase was based on an average stormflow it resulted in about a 0.04 inch rise in quickflow and a 0.01 inch rise in delayed flow. Brush to grass conversion affected the complete range of streamflows measured although the larger flows were more variable. The 30 percent increase in the quick and delayed flow components suggested that: 1) conversion produced a uniform rise in the stormflow hydrograph as opposed to affecting any single parameter, and 2) as such, produced no major changes in the runoff patterns.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296104-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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