Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296097
Title:
Residential Water Demand: A Micro Analysis Using Survey Data
Author:
Woodard, Gary C.; Rasmussen, Todd C.
Affiliation:
Division of Economic and Business Research, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Issue Date:
7-Apr-1984
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Understanding residential water uses is important for forecasting water demand. Data from survey questionnaires received from over 2000 Tucson Water customers are used to analyze individual household water use patterns. Earlier findings by the authors based on aggregate census data are verified and expanded. Initial findings indicate that both indoor and peak outdoor water demand, modeled separately, are determined by three factors. The factors are categorized as 1) a demographic component, describing the number of people in the household and their ages, 2) a wealth component, relating water consumption to income, home value and certain appliance ownership, and 3) a residency component, which includes the age of the home, length of time the household has lived in the home, and length of time the household has lived in the Tucson area. Regression analysis indicates that households newer to Tucson consume less water than otherwise similar households. The analysis also shows that an average swimming pool consumes substantially more water than a lawn of equal area. Two actions resulting in reduced indoor water consumption are installing low-flow plumbing devices and directly paying the water bill. Water conservation program strategies based upon these findings are summarized.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleResidential Water Demand: A Micro Analysis Using Survey Dataen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodard, Gary C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Todd C.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Economic and Business Research, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1984-04-07-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding residential water uses is important for forecasting water demand. Data from survey questionnaires received from over 2000 Tucson Water customers are used to analyze individual household water use patterns. Earlier findings by the authors based on aggregate census data are verified and expanded. Initial findings indicate that both indoor and peak outdoor water demand, modeled separately, are determined by three factors. The factors are categorized as 1) a demographic component, describing the number of people in the household and their ages, 2) a wealth component, relating water consumption to income, home value and certain appliance ownership, and 3) a residency component, which includes the age of the home, length of time the household has lived in the home, and length of time the household has lived in the Tucson area. Regression analysis indicates that households newer to Tucson consume less water than otherwise similar households. The analysis also shows that an average swimming pool consumes substantially more water than a lawn of equal area. Two actions resulting in reduced indoor water consumption are installing low-flow plumbing devices and directly paying the water bill. Water conservation program strategies based upon these findings are summarized.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296097-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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