Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296087
Title:
A Hierarchal Model for Arizona's Water Resources
Author:
Buras, Nathan
Affiliation:
Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
Issue Date:
16-Apr-1983
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Arizona's water resources system consists primarily of four active management areas (Tucson, Phoenix, Pinal and Prescott), the Central Arizona Project, and the Salt River Project. The problem of water allocation among user categories involves pumping from aquifers and diversions of surface flows. In systems less complex than Arizona, allocation policies may appear obvious. In this case, however, a two-level hierarchical management model is proposed to control water allocation to users: the active management areas as a lower echelon, and the Arizona Department of Water Resources at the higher level. A system theoretic approach combined with recent developments in the decentralized control theory are proposed to be included in the model. A significant characteristic of the proposed model is the ability to consider possible interactions among the active management areas as a result of policy decisions at the State level. A dynamic optimization model based on a state space formulation with total energy required as the objective function is solved for each of the subsystems. Detailed information thus generated at the regional level is then appropriately aggregated for statewide decision making. An iterative algorithm is suggested.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA Hierarchal Model for Arizona's Water Resourcesen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuras, Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721en_US
dc.date.issued1983-04-16-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractArizona's water resources system consists primarily of four active management areas (Tucson, Phoenix, Pinal and Prescott), the Central Arizona Project, and the Salt River Project. The problem of water allocation among user categories involves pumping from aquifers and diversions of surface flows. In systems less complex than Arizona, allocation policies may appear obvious. In this case, however, a two-level hierarchical management model is proposed to control water allocation to users: the active management areas as a lower echelon, and the Arizona Department of Water Resources at the higher level. A system theoretic approach combined with recent developments in the decentralized control theory are proposed to be included in the model. A significant characteristic of the proposed model is the ability to consider possible interactions among the active management areas as a result of policy decisions at the State level. A dynamic optimization model based on a state space formulation with total energy required as the objective function is solved for each of the subsystems. Detailed information thus generated at the regional level is then appropriately aggregated for statewide decision making. An iterative algorithm is suggested.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296087-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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