Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/296069
Title:
Tucson's Needs for Central Arizona Project Storage
Author:
Davis, Steven E.
Affiliation:
Tucson Water, Tucson, Arizona 85726
Issue Date:
16-Apr-1983
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The future acceptance and utilization of Central Arizona Project water by the City of Tucson Water Utility present many complex technical, economic, institutional, and environmental problems. Since Congressional adoption of the Colorado River Basin Project Act in 1968, Tucson Water engineers have supported the concept of a large CAP raw water storage reservoir near Cat Mountain west of the City. The United States Bureau of Reclamation, in its Stage Two planning for Phase B of the Tucson Aqueduct, has identified four potential storage sites, including the Cat Mountain location, for economic and environmental evaluation in conjunction with two basic aqueduct alignments. Engineers of the municipal water utility have utilized available computer tools to develop a preferred CAP delivery location and elevation economically advantageous to water rate payers. This paper discusses the various factors associated with Tucson's projected need for CAP water storage including reliability, operational flexibility, water quality, shortage, and power management. Each of these factors will affect the degree to which the water utility can successfully assimilate Central Arizona Project water into its groundwater supply system. Although a decision regarding storage location and volume has been postponed for the present, the initial years of CAP usage by the City of Tucson will provide sufficient test to justify the decision for no storage or prove its necessity.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTucson's Needs for Central Arizona Project Storageen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Steven E.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentTucson Water, Tucson, Arizona 85726en_US
dc.date.issued1983-04-16-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe future acceptance and utilization of Central Arizona Project water by the City of Tucson Water Utility present many complex technical, economic, institutional, and environmental problems. Since Congressional adoption of the Colorado River Basin Project Act in 1968, Tucson Water engineers have supported the concept of a large CAP raw water storage reservoir near Cat Mountain west of the City. The United States Bureau of Reclamation, in its Stage Two planning for Phase B of the Tucson Aqueduct, has identified four potential storage sites, including the Cat Mountain location, for economic and environmental evaluation in conjunction with two basic aqueduct alignments. Engineers of the municipal water utility have utilized available computer tools to develop a preferred CAP delivery location and elevation economically advantageous to water rate payers. This paper discusses the various factors associated with Tucson's projected need for CAP water storage including reliability, operational flexibility, water quality, shortage, and power management. Each of these factors will affect the degree to which the water utility can successfully assimilate Central Arizona Project water into its groundwater supply system. Although a decision regarding storage location and volume has been postponed for the present, the initial years of CAP usage by the City of Tucson will provide sufficient test to justify the decision for no storage or prove its necessity.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/296069-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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