Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/294838
Title:
A New Life Behind Bars - A Prison Retrofit From Prison to Community Resource
Author:
Machado, Micaela
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Sustainability practices in design development are a common goal in urban settings, especially in an environment such as the arid Southwest U.S. where resources are limited. Here, sunshine and heat are abundant where water resources are low. So, how can we use these circumstances and constraints to our advantage in future designs or in potential retrofits? Institutional establishments with long-term residents, such as prisons, which use a significant amount of resources can reduce their energy, food and water costs by using sustainable practices. These practices can help reduce the costs of prisoner housing and eventually lower costs to tax payers. This project focuses on a hypothetical retrofit of the Wilmot Department of Corrections (Wilmot D.O.C.) prison facility in Tucson, AZ.
Type:
text; Electronic Report
Degree Name:
MLA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Landscape Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Scott, Beth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA New Life Behind Bars - A Prison Retrofit From Prison to Community Resourceen_US
dc.contributor.authorMachado, Micaelaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractSustainability practices in design development are a common goal in urban settings, especially in an environment such as the arid Southwest U.S. where resources are limited. Here, sunshine and heat are abundant where water resources are low. So, how can we use these circumstances and constraints to our advantage in future designs or in potential retrofits? Institutional establishments with long-term residents, such as prisons, which use a significant amount of resources can reduce their energy, food and water costs by using sustainable practices. These practices can help reduce the costs of prisoner housing and eventually lower costs to tax payers. This project focuses on a hypothetical retrofit of the Wilmot Department of Corrections (Wilmot D.O.C.) prison facility in Tucson, AZ.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Reporten_US
thesis.degree.nameMLAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLandscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairScott, Bethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScott, Bethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStoltz, Ronen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNorth, Deben_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/294838-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.