Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/294837
Title:
Integrating Biophilic Principles and Therapeutic Design Elements in Outdoor Spaces for Children at Tucson Medical Center
Author:
Davidson, Deryn
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
As concern for the health and wellbeing of children grows in a society geared toward a more sedentary lifestyle, many doctors and therapists are pointing to the importance of access to, and time spent interacting with the natural world. The idea of using the restorative properties of nature in healing has been around since ancient times. There is currently a renaissance in the health care industry looking at the importance of incorporating gardens into the design of health care facilities once again. This project proposes to explore the importance for children in health care facilities to have access to the natural world while using the biophilia hypothesis as a framework for design. Furthermore, the benefits of outdoor areas for the families (particularly siblings) of child patients and the staff of the health care facilities was explored. Through the use of literature and case reviews, data was collected and synthesized to determine the elements best used to strengthen the designs for children’s therapeutic environments. Outcomes include three models of therapeutic environments including focus areas for the Tucson Medical Center campus in Tucson, Arizona.
Type:
text; Electronic Report
Keywords:
biophilia; biophilic design; therapeutic; healing; gardens; children; nature; health care; design; play
Degree Name:
MLA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Landscape Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Livingston, Margaret

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIntegrating Biophilic Principles and Therapeutic Design Elements in Outdoor Spaces for Children at Tucson Medical Centeren_US
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Derynen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs concern for the health and wellbeing of children grows in a society geared toward a more sedentary lifestyle, many doctors and therapists are pointing to the importance of access to, and time spent interacting with the natural world. The idea of using the restorative properties of nature in healing has been around since ancient times. There is currently a renaissance in the health care industry looking at the importance of incorporating gardens into the design of health care facilities once again. This project proposes to explore the importance for children in health care facilities to have access to the natural world while using the biophilia hypothesis as a framework for design. Furthermore, the benefits of outdoor areas for the families (particularly siblings) of child patients and the staff of the health care facilities was explored. Through the use of literature and case reviews, data was collected and synthesized to determine the elements best used to strengthen the designs for children’s therapeutic environments. Outcomes include three models of therapeutic environments including focus areas for the Tucson Medical Center campus in Tucson, Arizona.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Reporten_US
dc.subjectbiophiliaen_US
dc.subjectbiophilic designen_US
dc.subjecttherapeuticen_US
dc.subjecthealingen_US
dc.subjectgardensen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectnatureen_US
dc.subjecthealth careen_US
dc.subjectdesignen_US
dc.subjectplayen_US
thesis.degree.nameMLAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLandscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLivingston, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLivingston, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBlazquez, Oscaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStoltz, Ronalden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/294837-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.