Sacred Sites and the Perpetuation of Religious Beliefs: Indigenous Understandings and Western Perspectives within Legal Frameworks

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/294043
Title:
Sacred Sites and the Perpetuation of Religious Beliefs: Indigenous Understandings and Western Perspectives within Legal Frameworks
Author:
Avila, Rosemary Michelle
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 15-May-2015
Abstract:
The way in which land is understood and perceived among American Indians and non-Indians is the cause for vast cultural misunderstandings and divisions between the two groups. For American Indian communities, attachments to place are at the core of religious practices, therefore intrinsically linking the importance of one to the other. This thesis attempts to better understand the way in which American Indians maintain connections to sacred sites, the challenges of access to those sites, and how their conceptualizations differ from Western models of value. This thesis examines the ability of federal policies, cases, legislative processes, and legal frameworks to protect American Indian sacred sites when the cultural context in which this protection is afforded has undeniable discrepancies to American Indian beliefs.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
American Indian Studies
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Luna-Firebaugh, Eileen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSacred Sites and the Perpetuation of Religious Beliefs: Indigenous Understandings and Western Perspectives within Legal Frameworksen_US
dc.creatorAvila, Rosemary Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorAvila, Rosemary Michelleen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 15-May-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractThe way in which land is understood and perceived among American Indians and non-Indians is the cause for vast cultural misunderstandings and divisions between the two groups. For American Indian communities, attachments to place are at the core of religious practices, therefore intrinsically linking the importance of one to the other. This thesis attempts to better understand the way in which American Indians maintain connections to sacred sites, the challenges of access to those sites, and how their conceptualizations differ from Western models of value. This thesis examines the ability of federal policies, cases, legislative processes, and legal frameworks to protect American Indian sacred sites when the cultural context in which this protection is afforded has undeniable discrepancies to American Indian beliefs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLuna-Firebaugh, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBegay, Manleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRodriguez, Robertoen_US
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