Yemen's Migrant Networks as Critical Factor in Political Opposition to the Imamate

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/294039
Title:
Yemen's Migrant Networks as Critical Factor in Political Opposition to the Imamate
Author:
Hertzman, Rachel
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Nineteenth and twentieth century migratory networks had a formative, yet unrecognized, impact in the lead-up to the 1962 establishment of the Yemen Arab Republic. Migrants from Northern Yemen to Aden built discursive spaces for contesting economic and political oppression that served as a foundation for later channels of political dissidents and reformists to oppose the Imamic regime, often walking a tightrope between their own calls for reform and the interests of foreign state actors. Those spaces were preserved in the later development of similar networks after 1962 and paved the way for generations of migrants to contest or advance reigning economic and social orders via labor migration to oil-rich states.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Near Eastern Studies
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Near Eastern Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hudson, Leila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleYemen's Migrant Networks as Critical Factor in Political Opposition to the Imamateen_US
dc.creatorHertzman, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorHertzman, Rachelen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNineteenth and twentieth century migratory networks had a formative, yet unrecognized, impact in the lead-up to the 1962 establishment of the Yemen Arab Republic. Migrants from Northern Yemen to Aden built discursive spaces for contesting economic and political oppression that served as a foundation for later channels of political dissidents and reformists to oppose the Imamic regime, often walking a tightrope between their own calls for reform and the interests of foreign state actors. Those spaces were preserved in the later development of similar networks after 1962 and paved the way for generations of migrants to contest or advance reigning economic and social orders via labor migration to oil-rich states.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFarwaneh, Samiraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLucas, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarston, Sallieen_US
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