Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293748
Title:
Investigating Hate Crimes in Farmington, New Mexico
Author:
Bennett, Cheryl Louise
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
This dissertation is not available in either the UA Campus Repository or the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database, per author request
Abstract:
The racial violence between Navajos and whites in Farmington, New Mexico is historical. One of the first documented acts of racial violence was in 1875, when white settlers would take gunshots at Navajos for entertainment. This violent atmosphere continued throughout the years, and most notoriously in 1974 with the murders of three Navajo men by three white teenagers. This violence was part of an ongoing cycle of racism and hostility between Navajos and whites. The murders ignited local and national media frenzy, and Farmington was dubbed the "Selma, Alabama of the Southwest." Navajo citizens responded to the murders with activism and demonstrations in the streets of Farmington, and demanded justice and change. Throughout subsequent years, racism and racial violence continues and Navajos are still the targets of hate crimes. The purpose of this study is to examine and investigate the hate crimes that have been committed against Navajo people in Farmington and its neighboring towns. This study, in particular, analyzes the impacts that hate crime has on Navajo citizens. Interviews with Navajo victims of hate crime expand on the findings of a pilot interview. The research in this dissertation shows that the affects of hate crime are long lasting and impact not only the victims but also the entire Navajo Nation. As a result of the unrelenting hate crimes in Farmington, the Navajo Nation has created a human rights commission to investigate race relations in Navajo Nation border towns. This study addresses what steps the Navajo Nation and Navajo citizens have taken to combat and recover from racism and racial violence. Finally, this study proposes interventions to improve race relations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Hate crimes; Navajo; Navajo activism; Race relations; Racism; American Indian Studies; Border towns
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tippeconnic-Fox, Mary Jo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInvestigating Hate Crimes in Farmington, New Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorBennett, Cheryl Louiseen_US
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Cheryl Louiseen_US
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseThis dissertation is not available in either the UA Campus Repository or the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database, per author requesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe racial violence between Navajos and whites in Farmington, New Mexico is historical. One of the first documented acts of racial violence was in 1875, when white settlers would take gunshots at Navajos for entertainment. This violent atmosphere continued throughout the years, and most notoriously in 1974 with the murders of three Navajo men by three white teenagers. This violence was part of an ongoing cycle of racism and hostility between Navajos and whites. The murders ignited local and national media frenzy, and Farmington was dubbed the "Selma, Alabama of the Southwest." Navajo citizens responded to the murders with activism and demonstrations in the streets of Farmington, and demanded justice and change. Throughout subsequent years, racism and racial violence continues and Navajos are still the targets of hate crimes. The purpose of this study is to examine and investigate the hate crimes that have been committed against Navajo people in Farmington and its neighboring towns. This study, in particular, analyzes the impacts that hate crime has on Navajo citizens. Interviews with Navajo victims of hate crime expand on the findings of a pilot interview. The research in this dissertation shows that the affects of hate crime are long lasting and impact not only the victims but also the entire Navajo Nation. As a result of the unrelenting hate crimes in Farmington, the Navajo Nation has created a human rights commission to investigate race relations in Navajo Nation border towns. This study addresses what steps the Navajo Nation and Navajo citizens have taken to combat and recover from racism and racial violence. Finally, this study proposes interventions to improve race relations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHate crimesen_US
dc.subjectNavajoen_US
dc.subjectNavajo activismen_US
dc.subjectRace relationsen_US
dc.subjectRacismen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectBorder townsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLuna-Firebaugh, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzales, Patrisiaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Raymond D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen_US
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