Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293622
Title:
Quantifying Mesoscale Soil Moisture with the Cosmic-Ray Rover
Author:
Chrisman, Bobby Brady
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Existing techniques measure soil moisture either at a point or over a large area many kilometers across. To bridge these two scales, we used the mobile cosmic-ray probe, or cosmic-ray rover, an instrument similar to the recently developed COSMOS probe, but bigger and mobile. This study explores the challenges and opportunities for making maps of soil moisture over large areas using the cosmic-ray rover. In 2012, soil moisture was mapped 22 times in a 25 km x 40 km survey area of the Tucson Basin at 1 km² resolution, i.e., at a scale comparable to that of a pixel for the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission. The soil moisture distribution is influenced mainly by climatic variations, notably by the North American monsoon, which resulted in a systematic change in the regional variance as a function of the mean soil moisture.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
COSMOS; Hydrology; Remote Sensing; Soil Moisture; Upscaling; Cosmic-Ray Rover
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zreda, Marek

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleQuantifying Mesoscale Soil Moisture with the Cosmic-Ray Roveren_US
dc.creatorChrisman, Bobby Bradyen_US
dc.contributor.authorChrisman, Bobby Bradyen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractExisting techniques measure soil moisture either at a point or over a large area many kilometers across. To bridge these two scales, we used the mobile cosmic-ray probe, or cosmic-ray rover, an instrument similar to the recently developed COSMOS probe, but bigger and mobile. This study explores the challenges and opportunities for making maps of soil moisture over large areas using the cosmic-ray rover. In 2012, soil moisture was mapped 22 times in a 25 km x 40 km survey area of the Tucson Basin at 1 km² resolution, i.e., at a scale comparable to that of a pixel for the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission. The soil moisture distribution is influenced mainly by climatic variations, notably by the North American monsoon, which resulted in a systematic change in the regional variance as a function of the mean soil moisture.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectCOSMOSen_US
dc.subjectHydrologyen_US
dc.subjectRemote Sensingen_US
dc.subjectSoil Moistureen_US
dc.subjectUpscalingen_US
dc.subjectCosmic-Ray Roveren_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZreda, Mareken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZeng, Xubinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShuttleworth, Jimen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFranz, Trentonen_US
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