Environmental Multiplicity in the Bahamas: Situating Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Conservation Ethics in Cultural Landscapes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293598
Title:
Environmental Multiplicity in the Bahamas: Situating Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Conservation Ethics in Cultural Landscapes
Author:
O'Meara, Nathaniel, B.
Affiliation:
Northern Arizona University; Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
May-2009
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Northern Arizona University
Abstract:
Based on ethnographic research conducted in the Exumas Cays, Bahamas, this thesis investigates how traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and conservation ethics are situated in place and integrated into cultural landscapes. This is illustrated using satellite imagery and ethnographic data to describe the TEK associated with kitchen gardens, plant-collecting areas, fishing grounds, farm fields and pastures within the traditional use areas of one Exumian settlement known as The Hermitage. By situating TEK in cultural landscapes, this thesis provides a more holistic representation of the interconnectedness between community, knowledge, practice, belief, place, and landscape. This thesis also includes discussions on the theoretical importance of linking TEK with place and landscape; the formation and role of conservation ethics in preserving places or resources in a local environment; and a description of an emerging theory in cultural ecology called environmental multiplicity, which argues for the resiliency of traditional social-ecological systems as a result of creating multiple subsistence strategies and webs of interdependent social relationships to guard against social and natural perturbations.
Keywords:
Traditional Ecological Knowledge; Cultural Landscapes; Sustainability; Ethnobotany; Environmental Multiplicity; Exuma, Bahamas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental Multiplicity in the Bahamas: Situating Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Conservation Ethics in Cultural Landscapesen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Meara, Nathaniel, B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentNorthern Arizona Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued2009-05-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherNorthern Arizona Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractBased on ethnographic research conducted in the Exumas Cays, Bahamas, this thesis investigates how traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and conservation ethics are situated in place and integrated into cultural landscapes. This is illustrated using satellite imagery and ethnographic data to describe the TEK associated with kitchen gardens, plant-collecting areas, fishing grounds, farm fields and pastures within the traditional use areas of one Exumian settlement known as The Hermitage. By situating TEK in cultural landscapes, this thesis provides a more holistic representation of the interconnectedness between community, knowledge, practice, belief, place, and landscape. This thesis also includes discussions on the theoretical importance of linking TEK with place and landscape; the formation and role of conservation ethics in preserving places or resources in a local environment; and a description of an emerging theory in cultural ecology called environmental multiplicity, which argues for the resiliency of traditional social-ecological systems as a result of creating multiple subsistence strategies and webs of interdependent social relationships to guard against social and natural perturbations.en_US
dc.subjectTraditional Ecological Knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectCultural Landscapesen_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectEthnobotanyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Multiplicityen_US
dc.subjectExuma, Bahamasen_US
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/293598-
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