Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293547
Title:
Early Field Experience in Choral Methods
Author:
Kim, Irene J.
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to identify the value of early field experience (EFE) in choral methods courses, examine participants' likelihood to include EFE practice in choral methods courses, and determine the rationale for incorporating EFE. The study also explored the participants' preferences for activities related to early field experience, investigated possible relationships between EFE activities and participants' teaching experience or primary responsibility and perceived student outcomes of such participation. A survey instrument was distributed to choral music educators identified through the College Music Society. A total of 100 (after adjustments) responses were collected and analyzed employing descriptive and inferential statistics. The result displayed a high consensus among participants on the value and future implementation of EFE practice in choral methods. Participants declared that educational philosophy, personal experience, and requirements influenced their reason for implementing EFE, with personal experience receiving the highest positive response. The survey listed four categories of EFE activities--teaching, observation, evaluation methods, and other EFE activities. Highest rated activities from each categories were as follows: micro teaching at an elementary, middle, or high school; individual observation at an elementary, middle, or high school; reflection/self-evaluation and instructor feedback; and university choral ensemble participation. The result of Two-Way MANOVA to determine significant relationship between EFE activities and participants' teaching experience or primary responsibility reported no correlation in general with the exception of one activity. A significant difference was observed between attending choral seminars and conferences and participants' primary responsibility (p = .01, p<.05). Expected student outcome was measured through five skill types: personal, content, pedagogical, administrative, and communication skills. Of these, all participants agreed on personal skill (100%) followed by communication (95%), content (94%), and pedagogical skills (94%) as their highest expected EFE student outcome. Early field experience has gained notable recognition among music teacher educators in the past three decades. Numerous studies have verified the benefits of EFE and national organizations have actively supported the practice. The results of this study echoed the results of previous research with an overwhelming percentage of participants displaying a high enthusiasm for EFE practice in choral methods courses.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Early Field Experience; Field Experience; Music Education; Preservice teacher program; Teacher Education; Music; Choral Methods
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hamann, Donald L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEarly Field Experience in Choral Methodsen_US
dc.creatorKim, Irene J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Irene J.en_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to identify the value of early field experience (EFE) in choral methods courses, examine participants' likelihood to include EFE practice in choral methods courses, and determine the rationale for incorporating EFE. The study also explored the participants' preferences for activities related to early field experience, investigated possible relationships between EFE activities and participants' teaching experience or primary responsibility and perceived student outcomes of such participation. A survey instrument was distributed to choral music educators identified through the College Music Society. A total of 100 (after adjustments) responses were collected and analyzed employing descriptive and inferential statistics. The result displayed a high consensus among participants on the value and future implementation of EFE practice in choral methods. Participants declared that educational philosophy, personal experience, and requirements influenced their reason for implementing EFE, with personal experience receiving the highest positive response. The survey listed four categories of EFE activities--teaching, observation, evaluation methods, and other EFE activities. Highest rated activities from each categories were as follows: micro teaching at an elementary, middle, or high school; individual observation at an elementary, middle, or high school; reflection/self-evaluation and instructor feedback; and university choral ensemble participation. The result of Two-Way MANOVA to determine significant relationship between EFE activities and participants' teaching experience or primary responsibility reported no correlation in general with the exception of one activity. A significant difference was observed between attending choral seminars and conferences and participants' primary responsibility (p = .01, p<.05). Expected student outcome was measured through five skill types: personal, content, pedagogical, administrative, and communication skills. Of these, all participants agreed on personal skill (100%) followed by communication (95%), content (94%), and pedagogical skills (94%) as their highest expected EFE student outcome. Early field experience has gained notable recognition among music teacher educators in the past three decades. Numerous studies have verified the benefits of EFE and national organizations have actively supported the practice. The results of this study echoed the results of previous research with an overwhelming percentage of participants displaying a high enthusiasm for EFE practice in choral methods courses.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEarly Field Experienceen_US
dc.subjectField Experienceen_US
dc.subjectMusic Educationen_US
dc.subjectPreservice teacher programen_US
dc.subjectTeacher Educationen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectChoral Methodsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHamann, Donald L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper, Shellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDraves, Tami J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHamann, Donald L.en_US
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