Modeling the Evolution of Rill Networks, Debris Fans, and Cinder Cones: Connections between Sediment Transport Processes and Landscape Development

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293538
Title:
Modeling the Evolution of Rill Networks, Debris Fans, and Cinder Cones: Connections between Sediment Transport Processes and Landscape Development
Author:
McGuire, Luke
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Landscapes evolve through a number of processes in response to a wide range of forcing mechanisms. Many of the processes that drive landscape evolution occur at the interface between fluid and sediment. Sediment transport leads to changes in topography that, in turn, influence fluid flow. Feedback mechanisms between topography and fluid flow can lead to the formation of patterns, such as sand ripples, dune fields, parallel channel networks, and periodically spaced valleys. In many cases, the development and evolution of patterns within landscapes are heavily influenced by environmental conditions. Therefore, given relationships between landform features and the underlying processes, present-day landscapes have the potential to be used to infer a record of climatic conditions over the course of their development. An inability to make direct observations over geologically relevant timescales makes it difficult to study the processes that influence landscape evolution. Mathematical models provide a means of quantitatively linking natural patterns and landscape features with physical processes. Patterns in landscapes also provide a simple means of testing quantitative representations of geomorphic processes. In this work, we develop landscape evolution models to study the development of debris-flow-dominated hillslopes, rill networks, and cinder cones. Through a combination of theoretical modeling, analysis of experimental data, and remote sensing data, we attempt to better understand each of these three systems. While each system is interesting in isolation, these and similar studies add to our knowledge of the mathematical representations of processes that are used more generally within the study of landscape evolution.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
debris fan; landscape evolution; numerical model; rill; Mathematics; cinder cone
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Mathematics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pelletier, Jon

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleModeling the Evolution of Rill Networks, Debris Fans, and Cinder Cones: Connections between Sediment Transport Processes and Landscape Developmenten_US
dc.creatorMcGuire, Lukeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Lukeen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLandscapes evolve through a number of processes in response to a wide range of forcing mechanisms. Many of the processes that drive landscape evolution occur at the interface between fluid and sediment. Sediment transport leads to changes in topography that, in turn, influence fluid flow. Feedback mechanisms between topography and fluid flow can lead to the formation of patterns, such as sand ripples, dune fields, parallel channel networks, and periodically spaced valleys. In many cases, the development and evolution of patterns within landscapes are heavily influenced by environmental conditions. Therefore, given relationships between landform features and the underlying processes, present-day landscapes have the potential to be used to infer a record of climatic conditions over the course of their development. An inability to make direct observations over geologically relevant timescales makes it difficult to study the processes that influence landscape evolution. Mathematical models provide a means of quantitatively linking natural patterns and landscape features with physical processes. Patterns in landscapes also provide a simple means of testing quantitative representations of geomorphic processes. In this work, we develop landscape evolution models to study the development of debris-flow-dominated hillslopes, rill networks, and cinder cones. Through a combination of theoretical modeling, analysis of experimental data, and remote sensing data, we attempt to better understand each of these three systems. While each system is interesting in isolation, these and similar studies add to our knowledge of the mathematical representations of processes that are used more generally within the study of landscape evolution.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectdebris fanen_US
dc.subjectlandscape evolutionen_US
dc.subjectnumerical modelen_US
dc.subjectrillen_US
dc.subjectMathematicsen_US
dc.subjectcinder coneen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMathematicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPelletier, Jonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrio, Moyseyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaker, Victoren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlasner, Karlen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPelletier, Jonen_US
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