Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293534
Title:
Heart Work: Challenges and Adaptations of Hospice Workers
Author:
Cain, Cindy L.
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation analyzes the everyday work experiences of hospice, a type of end-of-life care. The following chapters integrate micro-sociological perspectives with meso- and macro- level explanations of organizational behavior to account for workers' performances of emotional labor, care-related identities, constraints on their daily work, and ultimately hospice workers' strong commitment to their jobs and the hospice philosophy. Using a mixed methodological approach, I argue that hospice workers engage in emotional labor, but that instead of feeling dissonance or alienation, hospice workers develop a positive identity around their work. Their identities and work experiences are still constrained by institutional forces, however. Hospice workers' experiences highlight two tensions in the administration of caring labor: keeping commitment during times of organizational change and balancing the needs of the self with the needs of the care recipient. The main contributions of this work include new understandings of the relationships between identity, emotions, and work; a novel combination of theories that better explain care workers' behaviors and constraints on their action; and, a refined approach to thinking about emotional labor.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Death; Emotions; Hospice; Medicine; Work; Sociology; Care
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Grant, Don S., II

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHeart Work: Challenges and Adaptations of Hospice Workersen_US
dc.creatorCain, Cindy L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCain, Cindy L.en_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation analyzes the everyday work experiences of hospice, a type of end-of-life care. The following chapters integrate micro-sociological perspectives with meso- and macro- level explanations of organizational behavior to account for workers' performances of emotional labor, care-related identities, constraints on their daily work, and ultimately hospice workers' strong commitment to their jobs and the hospice philosophy. Using a mixed methodological approach, I argue that hospice workers engage in emotional labor, but that instead of feeling dissonance or alienation, hospice workers develop a positive identity around their work. Their identities and work experiences are still constrained by institutional forces, however. Hospice workers' experiences highlight two tensions in the administration of caring labor: keeping commitment during times of organizational change and balancing the needs of the self with the needs of the care recipient. The main contributions of this work include new understandings of the relationships between identity, emotions, and work; a novel combination of theories that better explain care workers' behaviors and constraints on their action; and, a refined approach to thinking about emotional labor.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDeathen_US
dc.subjectEmotionsen_US
dc.subjectHospiceen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectWorken_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.subjectCareen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGrant, Don S., IIen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeahey, Erin E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergesen, Albert J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCraft Morgan, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Don S., IIen_US
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