Indigenous Students, Families and Educators Negotiating School Choice and Educational Opportunity: A Critical Ethnographic Case Study of Enduring Struggle and Educational Survivance in a Southwest Charter School

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293532
Title:
Indigenous Students, Families and Educators Negotiating School Choice and Educational Opportunity: A Critical Ethnographic Case Study of Enduring Struggle and Educational Survivance in a Southwest Charter School
Author:
Anthony-Stevens, Vanessa Erin
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This critical ethnography focuses on the practice of an Indigenous-serving charter school in Arizona and how it created space to practice culturally responsive schooling for Indigenous youth in an era of school accountability and standardizing educational reforms. Urban Native Middle School (pseudonym) opened for four years before being closed under tremendous state pressure from high-stakes testing accountability measurements. This study uses data spanning two periods of data collection: archived data collected at the time of the school's operation, and follow-up data tracking educators', parents' and students' experiences after the school's closure. Careful examination of student, educator, and parent narratives about the school during its years in operation illuminate how adults and youth co-authored a unique reterritorializing both/and discourse, building a school community of practice around connections to mainstream standardized knowledge and local Indigenous knowledges. The transformational potential of the schools both/and approach offered students access to strength-based both/and identities. The second phase of the study, which followed educators', parents', and students' into new school environments, illuminates practices of educational negotiation on the part of participants within geographies of limited educational opportunity for Native youth, both urban and rural. With four years of data collection, this study expands understanding of how Indigenous families choose among available educational environments in landscapes of limited school options and policy labels which fail to address the on-the-ground realities of schooling in Indigenous communities. For the Indigenous educators and families in this study, navigating school choice in an era of high-stakes testing reflects an enduring struggle of American Indian education with educational policy. This study's findings suggest that the transformative potential of both/and schooling has positive and wide reaching implications on the school experience of Native youth, and further illuminates the persevering practices of Indigenous educational survivance in seeking access to more equitable, culturally sustaining educational experiences. With implications for practice and policy, this anthropologic case study of an Indigenous-serving charter school considers the powerful impacts of human relationships on student learning and critiques the injustice perpetuated by snapshot accountability measurements which deny students' spaces for cultivating bridges to access imagined futures.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Anthropology of education; Charter Schools; Culturally Responsive Schooling; Educational survivance; Ethnography; Language, Reading & Culture; American Indian Education
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading & Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wyman, Leisy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIndigenous Students, Families and Educators Negotiating School Choice and Educational Opportunity: A Critical Ethnographic Case Study of Enduring Struggle and Educational Survivance in a Southwest Charter Schoolen_US
dc.creatorAnthony-Stevens, Vanessa Erinen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnthony-Stevens, Vanessa Erinen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis critical ethnography focuses on the practice of an Indigenous-serving charter school in Arizona and how it created space to practice culturally responsive schooling for Indigenous youth in an era of school accountability and standardizing educational reforms. Urban Native Middle School (pseudonym) opened for four years before being closed under tremendous state pressure from high-stakes testing accountability measurements. This study uses data spanning two periods of data collection: archived data collected at the time of the school's operation, and follow-up data tracking educators', parents' and students' experiences after the school's closure. Careful examination of student, educator, and parent narratives about the school during its years in operation illuminate how adults and youth co-authored a unique reterritorializing both/and discourse, building a school community of practice around connections to mainstream standardized knowledge and local Indigenous knowledges. The transformational potential of the schools both/and approach offered students access to strength-based both/and identities. The second phase of the study, which followed educators', parents', and students' into new school environments, illuminates practices of educational negotiation on the part of participants within geographies of limited educational opportunity for Native youth, both urban and rural. With four years of data collection, this study expands understanding of how Indigenous families choose among available educational environments in landscapes of limited school options and policy labels which fail to address the on-the-ground realities of schooling in Indigenous communities. For the Indigenous educators and families in this study, navigating school choice in an era of high-stakes testing reflects an enduring struggle of American Indian education with educational policy. This study's findings suggest that the transformative potential of both/and schooling has positive and wide reaching implications on the school experience of Native youth, and further illuminates the persevering practices of Indigenous educational survivance in seeking access to more equitable, culturally sustaining educational experiences. With implications for practice and policy, this anthropologic case study of an Indigenous-serving charter school considers the powerful impacts of human relationships on student learning and critiques the injustice perpetuated by snapshot accountability measurements which deny students' spaces for cultivating bridges to access imagined futures.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAnthropology of educationen_US
dc.subjectCharter Schoolsen_US
dc.subjectCulturally Responsive Schoolingen_US
dc.subjectEducational survivanceen_US
dc.subjectEthnographyen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Educationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWyman, Leisyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilmore, Perryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzález, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNicholas, Sheilahen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWyman, Leisyen_US
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