Bridges Between Me: Liminality, Authenticity, and Re/integration in American Indian Literature

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293493
Title:
Bridges Between Me: Liminality, Authenticity, and Re/integration in American Indian Literature
Author:
Ellasante, Ian
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 03-Nov-2013
Abstract:
With both its inherent alienation and freedom, the experience of liminality, or the occupation of transitional spaces, is in many ways universally human. However, by nature of their bicultural liminality and the oppressive and pervasive demand for what Paula Gunn Allen terms "Indianness" American Indian authors must also confront and negotiate questions of authenticity. In so doing, many have taken the opportunity to subvert those demands, to juxtapose their actual multifaceted identities against them, to make meaning from the contrast, and to create from that re/integrated space. This thesis elucidates these points as an introduction to the body of poems that follow. The poems, often instruments of my own liminality, explore the broad themes of place, family, and identity.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Liminality; Poetry; American Indian Studies; American Indian Literature
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Washburn, Frances

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBridges Between Me: Liminality, Authenticity, and Re/integration in American Indian Literatureen_US
dc.creatorEllasante, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorEllasante, Ianen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 03-Nov-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractWith both its inherent alienation and freedom, the experience of liminality, or the occupation of transitional spaces, is in many ways universally human. However, by nature of their bicultural liminality and the oppressive and pervasive demand for what Paula Gunn Allen terms "Indianness" American Indian authors must also confront and negotiate questions of authenticity. In so doing, many have taken the opportunity to subvert those demands, to juxtapose their actual multifaceted identities against them, to make meaning from the contrast, and to create from that re/integrated space. This thesis elucidates these points as an introduction to the body of poems that follow. The poems, often instruments of my own liminality, explore the broad themes of place, family, and identity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectLiminalityen_US
dc.subjectPoetryen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Literatureen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWashburn, Francesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvers, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFatzinger, Amyen_US
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