Battling to Secure America's Borders: Understanding Micromobilization in the Contemporary U.S. Anti-Immigration Movement

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293485
Title:
Battling to Secure America's Borders: Understanding Micromobilization in the Contemporary U.S. Anti-Immigration Movement
Author:
Ward, Matthew
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 09-Apr-2019
Abstract:
This dissertation casts a wide net in order to explain the recent emergence and proliferation of the contemporary anti-immigration movement in the United States. Anti-immigration activism is an understudied but not entirely overlooked phenomenon. Yet, we know incredibly little about an important set of macro- and micro- questions related to contemporary anti-immigration activism. This dissertation addresses big-picture mobilization questions, such as: What large-scale, historical preconditions set the stage for the emergence and proliferation of contemporary anti-immigration activism in the United States? And how--and through what general processes--has pro-migrant countermobilization influenced the anti-immigration movement and, perhaps, unintentionally spurred its growth? Finally, I address micro-level questions focused around the mechanics of micromobilization: How and why do individuals support anti-immigration activism? How and why do individuals become motivated to engage in anti-immigration activity? and How and why do individuals ultimately participate in anti-immigration-related activism? In sum, both big-picture and small-scale questions anchor this dissertation. By answering these I not only shed light on this specific case but also make a number of more general contributions to social movement literature.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
immigration; minuteman; minutemen; social movement; vigilante; Sociology; anti-immigration
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ragin, Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBattling to Secure America's Borders: Understanding Micromobilization in the Contemporary U.S. Anti-Immigration Movementen_US
dc.creatorWard, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorWard, Matthewen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 09-Apr-2019en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation casts a wide net in order to explain the recent emergence and proliferation of the contemporary anti-immigration movement in the United States. Anti-immigration activism is an understudied but not entirely overlooked phenomenon. Yet, we know incredibly little about an important set of macro- and micro- questions related to contemporary anti-immigration activism. This dissertation addresses big-picture mobilization questions, such as: What large-scale, historical preconditions set the stage for the emergence and proliferation of contemporary anti-immigration activism in the United States? And how--and through what general processes--has pro-migrant countermobilization influenced the anti-immigration movement and, perhaps, unintentionally spurred its growth? Finally, I address micro-level questions focused around the mechanics of micromobilization: How and why do individuals support anti-immigration activism? How and why do individuals become motivated to engage in anti-immigration activity? and How and why do individuals ultimately participate in anti-immigration-related activism? In sum, both big-picture and small-scale questions anchor this dissertation. By answering these I not only shed light on this specific case but also make a number of more general contributions to social movement literature.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectimmigrationen_US
dc.subjectminutemanen_US
dc.subjectminutemenen_US
dc.subjectsocial movementen_US
dc.subjectvigilanteen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.subjectanti-immigrationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRagin, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeyerlein, Kraigen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSallaz, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeahey, Erinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRagin, Charlesen_US
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