Early Pottery in the Tropics of Panama (Ca. 4,500-3,200 B.P.): Production Processes, Circulation, and Diagenesis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293475
Title:
Early Pottery in the Tropics of Panama (Ca. 4,500-3,200 B.P.): Production Processes, Circulation, and Diagenesis
Author:
Iizuka, Fumie
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 15-Aug-2013
Abstract:
Despite the association of the first pottery with food production and sedentism, case studies show hunter gatherers with different degrees of sedentism commonly adopted ceramics. Monagrillo ware (∼ 4500-3200 BP), central Panama, early in Central America, was made by egalitarian slash and burn farmers, cultivating domesticated seed and root crops. People occupied inland rockshelters and coastal shell middens. Their degree of sedentism is debated. It is unclear whether they were sedentary both in the inland and the coast exchanging resources or whether inland people visited the coast during dry periods. Their pottery functions are not well understood. I provenanced and studied production processes and diagenesis of Monagrillo pottery combining life history approach and archaeometric methods. I assessed the degree of sedentism of people and inferred vessel functions producers expected. I studied diagenesis because it probably affects analytical results. My study showed that pottery was produced and used in the foothills and on the coast, possibly, in the plains, of the seasonally dry Pacific side of Panama. This suggested that people were sedentary in areas surrounding Parita Bay. Vessels from the Pacific foothills were transported to perennially wet Caribbean slopes; where production was difficult due to precipitation. According to technical choices made, I infer that potters in the Pacific foothills opted for useful and dependable designs, for cooking. Transportability and resistance to weathering were also important. Pacific coastal producers may have chosen designs for cooking-related attributes, but not transportation. Finally, a Pacific plains intermediate site had a high proportion of vessels from both the Pacific foothills and the coast and had a high proportion of decorated sherds. This site may have had special functions such as for meeting, feasting, and exchange. All producers shared manufacturing techniques indicating relatedness. Sherds excavated from the Caribbean zone and the Pacific coast had different diagenetic patterns suggesting climatic differences; this identification helped source pottery. My work contributes to knowledge about pottery origins and degrees of sedentism, technical choices made to reach functional needs, and climatic impact on production and post-depositional changes.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Life history; Panama; Pottery origins; Provenancing; Technology and function; Anthropology; Degree of sedentism
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schiffer, Michael B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEarly Pottery in the Tropics of Panama (Ca. 4,500-3,200 B.P.): Production Processes, Circulation, and Diagenesisen_US
dc.creatorIizuka, Fumieen_US
dc.contributor.authorIizuka, Fumieen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 15-Aug-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractDespite the association of the first pottery with food production and sedentism, case studies show hunter gatherers with different degrees of sedentism commonly adopted ceramics. Monagrillo ware (∼ 4500-3200 BP), central Panama, early in Central America, was made by egalitarian slash and burn farmers, cultivating domesticated seed and root crops. People occupied inland rockshelters and coastal shell middens. Their degree of sedentism is debated. It is unclear whether they were sedentary both in the inland and the coast exchanging resources or whether inland people visited the coast during dry periods. Their pottery functions are not well understood. I provenanced and studied production processes and diagenesis of Monagrillo pottery combining life history approach and archaeometric methods. I assessed the degree of sedentism of people and inferred vessel functions producers expected. I studied diagenesis because it probably affects analytical results. My study showed that pottery was produced and used in the foothills and on the coast, possibly, in the plains, of the seasonally dry Pacific side of Panama. This suggested that people were sedentary in areas surrounding Parita Bay. Vessels from the Pacific foothills were transported to perennially wet Caribbean slopes; where production was difficult due to precipitation. According to technical choices made, I infer that potters in the Pacific foothills opted for useful and dependable designs, for cooking. Transportability and resistance to weathering were also important. Pacific coastal producers may have chosen designs for cooking-related attributes, but not transportation. Finally, a Pacific plains intermediate site had a high proportion of vessels from both the Pacific foothills and the coast and had a high proportion of decorated sherds. This site may have had special functions such as for meeting, feasting, and exchange. All producers shared manufacturing techniques indicating relatedness. Sherds excavated from the Caribbean zone and the Pacific coast had different diagenetic patterns suggesting climatic differences; this identification helped source pottery. My work contributes to knowledge about pottery origins and degrees of sedentism, technical choices made to reach functional needs, and climatic impact on production and post-depositional changes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectLife historyen_US
dc.subjectPanamaen_US
dc.subjectPottery originsen_US
dc.subjectProvenancingen_US
dc.subjectTechnology and functionen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectDegree of sedentismen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAldenderfer, Mark S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKillick, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVandiver, Pamela B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
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