Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293470
Title:
Monitoring Microbial Water Quality via Online Sensors
Author:
Sherchan, Samendra Prasad
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 20-Aug-2013
Abstract:
To protect public health, detection and treatment technologies have been improved to monitor and inactivate pathogens in drinking water. The goal of this dissertation is to evaluate and utilize multiple online sensors and advanced oxidation processes to document both the detection as well as destruction of microbial contaminants in real-time. Reviews of rapid detection technologies for real-time monitoring of pathogens in drinking water and advanced technologies to inactivate pathogens in water are shown in Appendices A and B. The study in Appendix C evaluated the efficacy of real-time sensors for the detection of microbial contaminants. Bacillus thuringiensis was used in this research as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis to determine each sensor response and detection capability. The minimum threshold responses of sensors were determined by injecting B.thuringiensis into deionized (DI), raw (unfiltered) tap water, or filtered tap water over a concentration range of 10² - 10⁵ spores/ml. The BioSentry sensor responded to increases in concentration over the range of 10² - 10⁵ spores/ml. Below this range, sensors provided signals undistinguishable from background noise. The select sensors can detect microbial water quality changes, and these advanced technologies can be integrated to monitor intrusion events in water distribution systems. The study in Appendix D evaluated the efficiency of the UV reactor for inactivation of MS2 coliphage. The virus MS2 coliphage (ATCC 15597-B1) has been proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a standard for UV reactor validation in the United States. In addition, MS2 is used as a surrogate for enteric viruses due to its similar size and morphology. Following UV radiation at a flow rate of 2gpm, infective MS2 showed a reduction of 5.3- log₁₀ when quantified with cultural plaque counts, whereas corresponding quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) data showed only a 1.7- log₁₀ reduction in viral RNA copy number. In contrast, plaque assay revealed a 5.8- log₁₀ inactivation; a slight increase in infective MS2 coliphage reduction at 1 gal per min but qPCR results indicate a 2.8- log₁₀ reduction in viral RNA copy number; a one log more inactivation compared to 2 gpm. When H₂O₂ was added at either 2.5 or 5 mg/l with UV at either flow rate, enhanced MS2 inactivation occurred with a greater than 7 log₁₀ reduction observed via plaque counts, indicating that all added MS2 had been inactivated, since no plaques were formed after incubation at 37°C for 24 hours. Correspondingly, qPCR data only showed a 3-4 log₁₀ reduction in viral RNA copy number. The study in Appendix E utilized online sensor to document the destruction of E.coli and Bacillus thuringiensis spores by UV/H₂O₂ treatment. In this study, Escherichia coli was tested for potential UV/H2O2 treatment in DI water and online sensors were also integrated to monitor the destruction in real-time. Pilot-scale experiments were performed using a Trojan UVSwift SC reactor (Trojan Technologies, London, ON, Canada) at a flow rate of 1 gal./min (gpm). UV radiation and UV/H₂O₂ combination in E.coli cell suspensions resulted in a >6 log₁₀ reduction of the viable counts. Similar exposure to B.thuringiensis spores resulted in a 3 log₁₀ reduction in viable counts. Scanning electron microscopy of the treated samples revealed severe damage on the surface of most E.coli cells, yet there was no significant change observed in the morphology of the B. thuringiensis spores. Following UV/H₂O₂ exposure, the BioSentry sensor showed an increase in the unknown, rod and spores counts, and did not correspond well when compared to viable counts assays. Data from this study show that advanced oxidation processes effectively inactivate E. coli vegetative cells, but not B.thuringiensis spores which were more resistant to UV/H₂O₂.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
microorganisms; online sensors; rapid detection; water quality; water reuse; Soil, Water & Environmental Science; drinking water
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water & Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pepper, Ian L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMonitoring Microbial Water Quality via Online Sensorsen_US
dc.creatorSherchan, Samendra Prasaden_US
dc.contributor.authorSherchan, Samendra Prasaden_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 20-Aug-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractTo protect public health, detection and treatment technologies have been improved to monitor and inactivate pathogens in drinking water. The goal of this dissertation is to evaluate and utilize multiple online sensors and advanced oxidation processes to document both the detection as well as destruction of microbial contaminants in real-time. Reviews of rapid detection technologies for real-time monitoring of pathogens in drinking water and advanced technologies to inactivate pathogens in water are shown in Appendices A and B. The study in Appendix C evaluated the efficacy of real-time sensors for the detection of microbial contaminants. Bacillus thuringiensis was used in this research as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis to determine each sensor response and detection capability. The minimum threshold responses of sensors were determined by injecting B.thuringiensis into deionized (DI), raw (unfiltered) tap water, or filtered tap water over a concentration range of 10² - 10⁵ spores/ml. The BioSentry sensor responded to increases in concentration over the range of 10² - 10⁵ spores/ml. Below this range, sensors provided signals undistinguishable from background noise. The select sensors can detect microbial water quality changes, and these advanced technologies can be integrated to monitor intrusion events in water distribution systems. The study in Appendix D evaluated the efficiency of the UV reactor for inactivation of MS2 coliphage. The virus MS2 coliphage (ATCC 15597-B1) has been proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a standard for UV reactor validation in the United States. In addition, MS2 is used as a surrogate for enteric viruses due to its similar size and morphology. Following UV radiation at a flow rate of 2gpm, infective MS2 showed a reduction of 5.3- log₁₀ when quantified with cultural plaque counts, whereas corresponding quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) data showed only a 1.7- log₁₀ reduction in viral RNA copy number. In contrast, plaque assay revealed a 5.8- log₁₀ inactivation; a slight increase in infective MS2 coliphage reduction at 1 gal per min but qPCR results indicate a 2.8- log₁₀ reduction in viral RNA copy number; a one log more inactivation compared to 2 gpm. When H₂O₂ was added at either 2.5 or 5 mg/l with UV at either flow rate, enhanced MS2 inactivation occurred with a greater than 7 log₁₀ reduction observed via plaque counts, indicating that all added MS2 had been inactivated, since no plaques were formed after incubation at 37°C for 24 hours. Correspondingly, qPCR data only showed a 3-4 log₁₀ reduction in viral RNA copy number. The study in Appendix E utilized online sensor to document the destruction of E.coli and Bacillus thuringiensis spores by UV/H₂O₂ treatment. In this study, Escherichia coli was tested for potential UV/H2O2 treatment in DI water and online sensors were also integrated to monitor the destruction in real-time. Pilot-scale experiments were performed using a Trojan UVSwift SC reactor (Trojan Technologies, London, ON, Canada) at a flow rate of 1 gal./min (gpm). UV radiation and UV/H₂O₂ combination in E.coli cell suspensions resulted in a >6 log₁₀ reduction of the viable counts. Similar exposure to B.thuringiensis spores resulted in a 3 log₁₀ reduction in viable counts. Scanning electron microscopy of the treated samples revealed severe damage on the surface of most E.coli cells, yet there was no significant change observed in the morphology of the B. thuringiensis spores. Following UV/H₂O₂ exposure, the BioSentry sensor showed an increase in the unknown, rod and spores counts, and did not correspond well when compared to viable counts assays. Data from this study show that advanced oxidation processes effectively inactivate E. coli vegetative cells, but not B.thuringiensis spores which were more resistant to UV/H₂O₂.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmicroorganismsen_US
dc.subjectonline sensorsen_US
dc.subjectrapid detectionen_US
dc.subjectwater qualityen_US
dc.subjectwater reuseen_US
dc.subjectSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.subjectdrinking wateren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSnyder, Shane A.en_US
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