Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293465
Title:
A Critical Analysis of Healing Touch for Depression and Anxiety
Author:
Harlow, Christina
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of provider based alternative medicine therapies such as chiropractic, massage, and acupuncture, has grown exponentially over the past decade as the price of traditional Western treatments has skyrocketed. Patients are seeking complementary treatments for a variety of ailments, including mental health. People with profound mental illness also have a reduced life expectancy and higher rates of chronic health problems than non-sufferers; and roughly 20% of people who used alternative therapies in the past year also had one or more psychiatric disorders. Healing Touch (HT) is based on the belief that humans have energy fields that change with states of illness; these energy fields can be manipulated to achieve wholeness or wellness. As nurses, touch has always been a part of our practice therefore it should not be a significant departure to entwine HT into our practice. Both anecdotal and research evidence has found that using HT for patients reduces anxiety and stress, helps support the life transition process, promotes self-empowerment, and enhances spiritual development. The implication of this evidence is that people suffering from anxiety and depression could benefit from HT in the primary care setting. When compared to the high cost of treating these illnesses, HT and other energy therapies are cost effective and have evidence supporting that treatment is effective enough to be inclusive. Depression and anxiety are extremely common and cross cultures, generations, and economic statuses. This describes the burden related to these conditions and why integrating HT in primary care practice is a viable, sustainable option. Current literature and research are discussed, and recommendations for practice in the form of a clinical practice protocol are presented.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
depression; healing touch; Nursing; anxiety
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sheppard, Kate G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Critical Analysis of Healing Touch for Depression and Anxietyen_US
dc.creatorHarlow, Christinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarlow, Christinaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of provider based alternative medicine therapies such as chiropractic, massage, and acupuncture, has grown exponentially over the past decade as the price of traditional Western treatments has skyrocketed. Patients are seeking complementary treatments for a variety of ailments, including mental health. People with profound mental illness also have a reduced life expectancy and higher rates of chronic health problems than non-sufferers; and roughly 20% of people who used alternative therapies in the past year also had one or more psychiatric disorders. Healing Touch (HT) is based on the belief that humans have energy fields that change with states of illness; these energy fields can be manipulated to achieve wholeness or wellness. As nurses, touch has always been a part of our practice therefore it should not be a significant departure to entwine HT into our practice. Both anecdotal and research evidence has found that using HT for patients reduces anxiety and stress, helps support the life transition process, promotes self-empowerment, and enhances spiritual development. The implication of this evidence is that people suffering from anxiety and depression could benefit from HT in the primary care setting. When compared to the high cost of treating these illnesses, HT and other energy therapies are cost effective and have evidence supporting that treatment is effective enough to be inclusive. Depression and anxiety are extremely common and cross cultures, generations, and economic statuses. This describes the burden related to these conditions and why integrating HT in primary care practice is a viable, sustainable option. Current literature and research are discussed, and recommendations for practice in the form of a clinical practice protocol are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectdepressionen_US
dc.subjecthealing touchen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectanxietyen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSheppard, Kate G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMichaels, Cathy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRussell-Kibble, Audreyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSheppard, Kate G.en_US
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