Local Interpretations of Global Trends: Body Concerns and Self-Projects Enacted by Young Emirati Women

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293452
Title:
Local Interpretations of Global Trends: Body Concerns and Self-Projects Enacted by Young Emirati Women
Author:
Trainer, Sarah Simpson
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation, I use the ethnographic case study of the United Arab Emirates to illustrate a much larger phenomenon that involves young women worldwide in the throes of identity negotiation at a time of accelerated global flows of information, foods, fashion, media images, fashions, health information, and health and self-enhancement products. My research utilizes ethnographic and anthropometric information as a means of investigating the ways in which these global flows are affecting the physical bodies, attitudes, behaviors, perceptions of self, and perceptions of community in a sample of young, female, Emiratis living in the UAE in the Arab Gulf in the twenty-first century. I employ biocultural methods and perspectives to examine bodies-as-products and bodies-as-projects in this cohort, focusing on health, beauty, and self-presentation projects. I also focus on the uncertainty and accompanying psychosocial stress that these women are subject to as a result of juggling globalized, "modern" opportunities and lifestyles on the one hand with local expectations and regulations on the other. Key to these analyses is the acknowledgment of the synergy between biology and culture, and the effects of both local and global factors on this synergy.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
body image; Nutrition Transition; obesity; stress; women; Anthropology; adolescence
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pike, Ivy L.; Nichter, Mimi

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLocal Interpretations of Global Trends: Body Concerns and Self-Projects Enacted by Young Emirati Womenen_US
dc.creatorTrainer, Sarah Simpsonen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrainer, Sarah Simpsonen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I use the ethnographic case study of the United Arab Emirates to illustrate a much larger phenomenon that involves young women worldwide in the throes of identity negotiation at a time of accelerated global flows of information, foods, fashion, media images, fashions, health information, and health and self-enhancement products. My research utilizes ethnographic and anthropometric information as a means of investigating the ways in which these global flows are affecting the physical bodies, attitudes, behaviors, perceptions of self, and perceptions of community in a sample of young, female, Emiratis living in the UAE in the Arab Gulf in the twenty-first century. I employ biocultural methods and perspectives to examine bodies-as-products and bodies-as-projects in this cohort, focusing on health, beauty, and self-presentation projects. I also focus on the uncertainty and accompanying psychosocial stress that these women are subject to as a result of juggling globalized, "modern" opportunities and lifestyles on the one hand with local expectations and regulations on the other. Key to these analyses is the acknowledgment of the synergy between biology and culture, and the effects of both local and global factors on this synergy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectbody imageen_US
dc.subjectNutrition Transitionen_US
dc.subjectobesityen_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.subjectwomenen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectadolescenceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPike, Ivy L.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Mimien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSilverstein, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPike, Ivy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Mimien_US
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