Witnessing In a Digital Age: Rhetorics of Memory Spaces after September 11, 2001

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293449
Title:
Witnessing In a Digital Age: Rhetorics of Memory Spaces after September 11, 2001
Author:
Haley-Brown, Jennifer
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This project offers an extended inquiry into the ways that multimodality and digitality influence contemporary practices of public memorialization. My project has two primary ambitions. First, I revisit methodologies for analyzing multimodal public memorials. Second, I advocate for public memorials that advance social justice by inviting and protecting a multiplicity of diverse, even competing memory discourses. Chapters 1 and 2 trace the development of public memory studies, spatial rhetorical studies, and multimodal studies. I argue that space, modality, time, lived practices, and marginalized practices must all be addressed to adequately understand how public memorials form discursive networks of power and meaning. This argument is heavily informed by the work of Chicana feminist and decolonial scholars, who contend that socially just history-making uncovers and recovers narratives that have been suppressed or ignored. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze two case studies of multimodal public memorials commemorating September 11, 2001: The Garden of Reflection Memorial in Pennsylvania and the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. Chapter 5 offers a methodology for analyzing multimodal public memorials as memory ecologies. I end the project by suggesting several options for deploying multimodality and digitality in public memorials in order to encourage socially just and multivocal memory practices.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Memory; Multimodal; Rhetoric; September 11; 2001; Space; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Digital
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kimme Hea, Amy C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWitnessing In a Digital Age: Rhetorics of Memory Spaces after September 11, 2001en_US
dc.creatorHaley-Brown, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaley-Brown, Jenniferen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project offers an extended inquiry into the ways that multimodality and digitality influence contemporary practices of public memorialization. My project has two primary ambitions. First, I revisit methodologies for analyzing multimodal public memorials. Second, I advocate for public memorials that advance social justice by inviting and protecting a multiplicity of diverse, even competing memory discourses. Chapters 1 and 2 trace the development of public memory studies, spatial rhetorical studies, and multimodal studies. I argue that space, modality, time, lived practices, and marginalized practices must all be addressed to adequately understand how public memorials form discursive networks of power and meaning. This argument is heavily informed by the work of Chicana feminist and decolonial scholars, who contend that socially just history-making uncovers and recovers narratives that have been suppressed or ignored. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze two case studies of multimodal public memorials commemorating September 11, 2001: The Garden of Reflection Memorial in Pennsylvania and the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. Chapter 5 offers a methodology for analyzing multimodal public memorials as memory ecologies. I end the project by suggesting several options for deploying multimodality and digitality in public memorials in order to encourage socially just and multivocal memory practices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectMultimodalen_US
dc.subjectRhetoricen_US
dc.subjectSeptember 11en_US
dc.subject2001en_US
dc.subjectSpaceen_US
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
dc.subjectDigitalen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKimme Hea, Amy C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLicona, Adela C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaca, Damianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKimme Hea, Amy C.en_US
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