Stories like a River: The Character of Indian Water Rights and Authority in the Wind River and Klamath-Trinity Basins

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293448
Title:
Stories like a River: The Character of Indian Water Rights and Authority in the Wind River and Klamath-Trinity Basins
Author:
Dillon, John F.
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The ability to decisively benefit from ample sources of freshwater represents a pivotal challenge for American Indian nations and their self-determination in the western United States. Climate change, population growth, and capitalist pressures continue to escalate demand for water in an already dry land. This project set out to listen and add practical perspective to the importance of water as reflected in various forms of stories in the context of American Indian reserved water rights. It explores dynamic confluences and divergences of worldviews that influence American Indian nations' relationships with water in the present sociopolitical context. The integral relationship between literatures, laws, and tribal sovereignty constructs this study's theoretical framework as it broadens scholarship on this connection to include the implications of water rights. This approach leads to a critical, or perhaps "literary critical," background for examining two major water rights struggles in the western United States; the first being court decisions on the Wind River Indian Reservation, home of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho Tribes, and secondly, the Klamath-Trinity Basin, where four federally recognized tribes recently partook in water rights settlement negotiations. Litigation and negotiations over vital water are presently limited to the minefield of ambiguous Western narratives on the values and uses of Indian water rights. While each conflict has its unique circumstances and personalities, EuroAmerican stories of control and superiority continue to justify the exploitation of water and subjugation of Indigenous human rights. Alternative forums might make room for restorying and more sustainably managing water.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
American Indian water rights; International law; law and literature; tribal sovereignty; Western water policy; American Indian Studies; American Indian fishing rights
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Washburn, Franci

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleStories like a River: The Character of Indian Water Rights and Authority in the Wind River and Klamath-Trinity Basinsen_US
dc.creatorDillon, John F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDillon, John F.en_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe ability to decisively benefit from ample sources of freshwater represents a pivotal challenge for American Indian nations and their self-determination in the western United States. Climate change, population growth, and capitalist pressures continue to escalate demand for water in an already dry land. This project set out to listen and add practical perspective to the importance of water as reflected in various forms of stories in the context of American Indian reserved water rights. It explores dynamic confluences and divergences of worldviews that influence American Indian nations' relationships with water in the present sociopolitical context. The integral relationship between literatures, laws, and tribal sovereignty constructs this study's theoretical framework as it broadens scholarship on this connection to include the implications of water rights. This approach leads to a critical, or perhaps "literary critical," background for examining two major water rights struggles in the western United States; the first being court decisions on the Wind River Indian Reservation, home of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho Tribes, and secondly, the Klamath-Trinity Basin, where four federally recognized tribes recently partook in water rights settlement negotiations. Litigation and negotiations over vital water are presently limited to the minefield of ambiguous Western narratives on the values and uses of Indian water rights. While each conflict has its unique circumstances and personalities, EuroAmerican stories of control and superiority continue to justify the exploitation of water and subjugation of Indigenous human rights. Alternative forums might make room for restorying and more sustainably managing water.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian water rightsen_US
dc.subjectInternational lawen_US
dc.subjectlaw and literatureen_US
dc.subjecttribal sovereigntyen_US
dc.subjectWestern water policyen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian fishing rightsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWashburn, Francien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Raymonden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvers, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, Robert A., Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWashburn, Francien_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.