Prominence in Yucatec Maya: The Role of Stress in Yucatec Maya Words

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293432
Title:
Prominence in Yucatec Maya: The Role of Stress in Yucatec Maya Words
Author:
Kidder, Emily
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Yucatec Maya (YM) is an indigenous language of Mexico that features both phonemic tonal distinctions and phonemic vowel length. These features are primarily associated with the phonetic cues of pitch and duration, which are also considered the primary correlates of stress in language. Though scholars have noted the existence of stress or accent since it was first documented centuries ago, no detailed account of stress as either a separate or related entity to tone or length has been made. This dissertation presents a unique view into YM prosody by looking at loan word incorporation in conjunction with native speaker intuitions, and production data. A case study of Spanish loan words into Yucatec finds that when Spanish words are incorporated into the YM prosodic system, the initial syllable undergoes lengthening. Statistical analyses performed on data from native speaker intuitions and production data, however, find no concrete pattern of obligatory stress on the word level in Yucatec Maya words.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
metrical theory; prominence; prosody; stress; Yucatec Maya; Anthropology & Linguistics; loan words
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology & Linguistics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hammond, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleProminence in Yucatec Maya: The Role of Stress in Yucatec Maya Wordsen_US
dc.creatorKidder, Emilyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKidder, Emilyen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractYucatec Maya (YM) is an indigenous language of Mexico that features both phonemic tonal distinctions and phonemic vowel length. These features are primarily associated with the phonetic cues of pitch and duration, which are also considered the primary correlates of stress in language. Though scholars have noted the existence of stress or accent since it was first documented centuries ago, no detailed account of stress as either a separate or related entity to tone or length has been made. This dissertation presents a unique view into YM prosody by looking at loan word incorporation in conjunction with native speaker intuitions, and production data. A case study of Spanish loan words into Yucatec finds that when Spanish words are incorporated into the YM prosodic system, the initial syllable undergoes lengthening. Statistical analyses performed on data from native speaker intuitions and production data, however, find no concrete pattern of obligatory stress on the word level in Yucatec Maya words.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmetrical theoryen_US
dc.subjectprominenceen_US
dc.subjectprosodyen_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.subjectYucatec Mayaen_US
dc.subjectAnthropology & Linguisticsen_US
dc.subjectloan wordsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology & Linguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHammond, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHill, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMendoza-Denton, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFountain, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOberly, Staceyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHammond, Michaelen_US
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