Why Women Rebel: Understanding Female Participation in Intrastate Conflict

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293429
Title:
Why Women Rebel: Understanding Female Participation in Intrastate Conflict
Author:
Henshaw, Alexis Leanna
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Studies indicating that women as leaders and negotiators have a pacifying effect on interstate conflict stand in contrast to the reality of women's active involvement in civil conflict through armed rebel groups and insurgencies. This dissertation seeks to provide insight into this apparent paradox by analyzing how and why women become involved in rebel groups, drawing on insights from feminist and IR theories to create a gendered theory of rebellion. Hypotheses developed from this theory are examined using new data on women's participation in rebel groups from 1990-2008. These tests are supplemented with qualitative analysis focusing on the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN) in El Salvador. Among the findings, data on rebel organizations in the post-Cold War era show that women are active in over half of all armed insurgencies, a level of activity much greater than what is recognized by current scholarship in international relations. The analysis also indicates that economic and ethnic- or religious-based grievance motivates women's participation, but disputes theories that portray rebels as profit- or power-seekers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
gender studies; terrorism; Political Science; civil conflict
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ghosn, Faten; Goertz, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWhy Women Rebel: Understanding Female Participation in Intrastate Conflicten_US
dc.creatorHenshaw, Alexis Leannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHenshaw, Alexis Leannaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStudies indicating that women as leaders and negotiators have a pacifying effect on interstate conflict stand in contrast to the reality of women's active involvement in civil conflict through armed rebel groups and insurgencies. This dissertation seeks to provide insight into this apparent paradox by analyzing how and why women become involved in rebel groups, drawing on insights from feminist and IR theories to create a gendered theory of rebellion. Hypotheses developed from this theory are examined using new data on women's participation in rebel groups from 1990-2008. These tests are supplemented with qualitative analysis focusing on the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN) in El Salvador. Among the findings, data on rebel organizations in the post-Cold War era show that women are active in over half of all armed insurgencies, a level of activity much greater than what is recognized by current scholarship in international relations. The analysis also indicates that economic and ethnic- or religious-based grievance motivates women's participation, but disputes theories that portray rebels as profit- or power-seekers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectgender studiesen_US
dc.subjectterrorismen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.subjectcivil conflicten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGhosn, Fatenen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoertz, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeterson, V. Spikeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJoseph, Mirandaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGhosn, Fatenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoertz, Garyen_US
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