The Public Health Impact of Immigration and Border Enforcement Policy and a Service-Learning Approach to Counter Ethno Racial Health Disparities in the US-Mexico Borderlands

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293425
Title:
The Public Health Impact of Immigration and Border Enforcement Policy and a Service-Learning Approach to Counter Ethno Racial Health Disparities in the US-Mexico Borderlands
Author:
Sabo, Samantha Jane
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Background: Historically, US immigration policy, including border enforcement, has served to define national belonging and through this process, has constructed particular groups as undesirable or threatening to the nation. Such political-economic strategies contribute to oppression through gender, ethnic, and class discrimination and economic and political exclusion. This dissertation is based on three studies that collectivity explored these issues as structural determinants of health (SDH) and forms of structural and everyday violence. Objectives: These studies aimed to (1) examine the relations between immigration related mistreatment and practices of ethno-racial profiling by immigration officials on health of Mexican immigrants of the Arizona border (2) contextualize the structural and everyday violence of such institutional practices through mistreatment narratives and (3) evaluate the impact of an intensive Border Health Service Learning Institute (BHSLI) on public health students' ability to locate such forms of violence and identify the role of public health advocacy. Methods: Study one and two are a secondary analysis of quantitative and qualitative data drawn from a random household sample of 299 Mexican-origin farmworkers. Study three is a qualitative analysis of 25 BHSLI student reflection journals from 2010-2012. Results: Farmworkers were US permanent residents and citizens, employed in US agriculture for 20 years. Approximately 25% reported immigration related mistreatment, more than 50% were personally victimized and 75% of mistreatment episodes occurred in a community location while residents engaged in routine activities. Immigration mistreatment was associated with a 2.3-increased risk for stress in adjusted models (OR 2.3, CI 1.2, 4.1). After a week at the US-Mexico border, BHSLI students articulated aspects of immigration and economic policy impacting health. Students framed economic and immigration policies as health policy and found the role of public health to convene stakeholders toward multi-institutional policy solutions. Conclusion: Immigration related mistreatment and ethno-racial profiling are historically embedded at institutional and individual levels and reproduce inequality overtime. Such institutional practices of discrimination are SDH and forms of structural and everyday violence. Academic public health programs, engaged in service learning strengthen students' abilities to learn and act on such SDH and contribute to campus-community engagement on related ethno-racial health disparities.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Immigration; Latino Health; Mistreatment; Policy; US-Mexico Border; Public Health; Ethno-racial Profiling
Degree Name:
D.P.H.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Public Health
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Teufel-Shone, Nicolette

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Public Health Impact of Immigration and Border Enforcement Policy and a Service-Learning Approach to Counter Ethno Racial Health Disparities in the US-Mexico Borderlandsen_US
dc.creatorSabo, Samantha Janeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSabo, Samantha Janeen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Historically, US immigration policy, including border enforcement, has served to define national belonging and through this process, has constructed particular groups as undesirable or threatening to the nation. Such political-economic strategies contribute to oppression through gender, ethnic, and class discrimination and economic and political exclusion. This dissertation is based on three studies that collectivity explored these issues as structural determinants of health (SDH) and forms of structural and everyday violence. Objectives: These studies aimed to (1) examine the relations between immigration related mistreatment and practices of ethno-racial profiling by immigration officials on health of Mexican immigrants of the Arizona border (2) contextualize the structural and everyday violence of such institutional practices through mistreatment narratives and (3) evaluate the impact of an intensive Border Health Service Learning Institute (BHSLI) on public health students' ability to locate such forms of violence and identify the role of public health advocacy. Methods: Study one and two are a secondary analysis of quantitative and qualitative data drawn from a random household sample of 299 Mexican-origin farmworkers. Study three is a qualitative analysis of 25 BHSLI student reflection journals from 2010-2012. Results: Farmworkers were US permanent residents and citizens, employed in US agriculture for 20 years. Approximately 25% reported immigration related mistreatment, more than 50% were personally victimized and 75% of mistreatment episodes occurred in a community location while residents engaged in routine activities. Immigration mistreatment was associated with a 2.3-increased risk for stress in adjusted models (OR 2.3, CI 1.2, 4.1). After a week at the US-Mexico border, BHSLI students articulated aspects of immigration and economic policy impacting health. Students framed economic and immigration policies as health policy and found the role of public health to convene stakeholders toward multi-institutional policy solutions. Conclusion: Immigration related mistreatment and ethno-racial profiling are historically embedded at institutional and individual levels and reproduce inequality overtime. Such institutional practices of discrimination are SDH and forms of structural and everyday violence. Academic public health programs, engaged in service learning strengthen students' abilities to learn and act on such SDH and contribute to campus-community engagement on related ethno-racial health disparities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectImmigrationen_US
dc.subjectLatino Healthen_US
dc.subjectMistreatmenten_US
dc.subjectPolicyen_US
dc.subjectUS-Mexico Borderen_US
dc.subjectPublic Healthen_US
dc.subjectEthno-racial Profilingen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.P.H.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePublic Healthen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTeufel-Shone, Nicoletteen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTeufel-Shone, Nicoletteen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarvajal, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEhiri, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, Susanen_US
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