Using Case-Case Study Designs to Study Foodborne Enteric Infections

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293418
Title:
Using Case-Case Study Designs to Study Foodborne Enteric Infections
Author:
Pogreba-Brown, Kristen
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Case-control studies are the traditional ways in which foodborne enteric diseases are studied and outbreaks are investigated. This method has some significant limitations and biases for diseases with low efficiency reporting rates, such as Campylobacter, a common foodborne disease. Case-case methodologies have been explored for these studies but have been implemented without any clear strategy. This dissertation aims to first, determine the common risk factors for Campylobacter in Arizona using the traditional case-control study design, second, to systematically compare case-case studies to the more common case-control studies, and third, to simultaneously compare the results of a community outbreak of Campylobacter using both case-control and case-case study designs. Results from these studies identified some unique risk factors for routine Campylobacter infection in Arizona that will be used to enhance surveillance for the disease in the state. A systematic review of case-case studies used for enteric diseases found that there are specific recommendations that can be put into place in determining what comparison cases should be selected based on the primary aims and goals of the study. Finally, the results of the simultaneous case-case and case-control studies of a Campylobacter outbreak showed that these methods may work best in conjunction with one another and in doing so, the most accurate depiction of the source of infection can be determined.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Case-case; Enteric disease; Outbreak; Epidemiology; Campylobacter
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Epidemiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harris, Robin B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleUsing Case-Case Study Designs to Study Foodborne Enteric Infectionsen_US
dc.creatorPogreba-Brown, Kristenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPogreba-Brown, Kristenen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCase-control studies are the traditional ways in which foodborne enteric diseases are studied and outbreaks are investigated. This method has some significant limitations and biases for diseases with low efficiency reporting rates, such as Campylobacter, a common foodborne disease. Case-case methodologies have been explored for these studies but have been implemented without any clear strategy. This dissertation aims to first, determine the common risk factors for Campylobacter in Arizona using the traditional case-control study design, second, to systematically compare case-case studies to the more common case-control studies, and third, to simultaneously compare the results of a community outbreak of Campylobacter using both case-control and case-case study designs. Results from these studies identified some unique risk factors for routine Campylobacter infection in Arizona that will be used to enhance surveillance for the disease in the state. A systematic review of case-case studies used for enteric diseases found that there are specific recommendations that can be put into place in determining what comparison cases should be selected based on the primary aims and goals of the study. Finally, the results of the simultaneous case-case and case-control studies of a Campylobacter outbreak showed that these methods may work best in conjunction with one another and in doing so, the most accurate depiction of the source of infection can be determined.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCase-caseen_US
dc.subjectEnteric diseaseen_US
dc.subjectOutbreaken_US
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectCampylobacteren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarris, Robin B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberErnst, Kaceyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReynolds, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoe, Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarris, Robin B.en_US
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