Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293404
Title:
Essays in Asset Allocation
Author:
Zhang, Huacheng
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation consists of two essays in asset allocation. In the first essay, I measure the value of active money management. I explore this issue by comprehensively examining the parametric rule proposed by Brandt, Santa-Clara and Valkanov (2009) (the BSV rule) out-of-sample for portfolio selection among 3516 stocks in CRSP and comparing this rule to the mean-variance (MV) rule and the naïve 1/N rule recently advocated by DeMiguel, Garlappi and Uppal (2009). The BSV rule outperforms both the MV and 1/N rules and the outperformance is robust to investment horizons and stock market states. The BSV rule is effective for investors with different preferences or investment opportunities. The effectiveness of the BSV rule is robust to data screening criteria, estimation periods, portfolio performance evaluation models, the business cycle, and stock market states. In the second essay, I explore the question of whether macroeconomic state variables are able to predict cross-sectional stock returns from the perspective of asset allocation. I find that conditioning on macroeconomic state variables leads to optimal portfolios with a Carhart alpha that is 125 basis points per month higher than unconditional optimal portfolios out-of-sample. Unfortunately, conditioning on macroeconomic states is subject to an "overfitting" problem and can lead investors to experience unexpected huge losses. My results suggest that macroeconomic state variables mare able to predict cross-sectional stock returns but risk-averse investors need to combine other funds (e.g. market portfolio) to take advantage of this predictability.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Business condition; Stock return predictability; Management; Asset allocation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lamoureux, Christopher

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEssays in Asset Allocationen_US
dc.creatorZhang, Huachengen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Huachengen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation consists of two essays in asset allocation. In the first essay, I measure the value of active money management. I explore this issue by comprehensively examining the parametric rule proposed by Brandt, Santa-Clara and Valkanov (2009) (the BSV rule) out-of-sample for portfolio selection among 3516 stocks in CRSP and comparing this rule to the mean-variance (MV) rule and the naïve 1/N rule recently advocated by DeMiguel, Garlappi and Uppal (2009). The BSV rule outperforms both the MV and 1/N rules and the outperformance is robust to investment horizons and stock market states. The BSV rule is effective for investors with different preferences or investment opportunities. The effectiveness of the BSV rule is robust to data screening criteria, estimation periods, portfolio performance evaluation models, the business cycle, and stock market states. In the second essay, I explore the question of whether macroeconomic state variables are able to predict cross-sectional stock returns from the perspective of asset allocation. I find that conditioning on macroeconomic state variables leads to optimal portfolios with a Carhart alpha that is 125 basis points per month higher than unconditional optimal portfolios out-of-sample. Unfortunately, conditioning on macroeconomic states is subject to an "overfitting" problem and can lead investors to experience unexpected huge losses. My results suggest that macroeconomic state variables mare able to predict cross-sectional stock returns but risk-averse investors need to combine other funds (e.g. market portfolio) to take advantage of this predictability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectBusiness conditionen_US
dc.subjectStock return predictabilityen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectAsset allocationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLamoureux, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCederburg, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirano, Keisukeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSias, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLamoureux, Christopheren_US
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