A Doctor of Nursing Practice-Led Transitions of Care Model for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293391
Title:
A Doctor of Nursing Practice-Led Transitions of Care Model for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack
Author:
Haynes, Helena
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Background/Objectives: Gaps in care due to the movement of patients between health settings and/or practitioners, known as transitions of care (TOC), may contribute to second stroke or TIA events. The elements that impact TOC in the stroke/TIA population have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study is to identify key elements of a Doctor of Nursing Practice-led TOC model that could be used to develop and evaluate a TOC program for the stroke/TIA population. Design: A descriptive study was performed to 1) identify elements that may affect transitions of care using a stroke database and post-discharge phone surveys and 2) based on information from Aim 1, propose a DNP-led TOC model specific to the stroke/TIA. Setting: An urban primary stroke center in the southwest United States. Participants: All patients in the GWTG®-stroke database from May 1 - December 31st, 2012 and patients who consented at discharge from the stroke unit following a stroke or TIA. Measurements: Patient demographics including: length of stay (LOS), age, race, ethnicity, comorbidities, insurance, discharge status, thirty-day readmission rate, and follow up survey. Results: Patient data (n=276) from GWTG®-stroke database was obtained. Average LOS was 7.81 +/- 11.15 days. The majority of patients were greater than age 65 (59%); 53% relied on Medicare support; those age 50-59 (21%) were most likely to be uninsured (47%). Fifty-one percent were discharged directly home, 48% of those were referred to outpatient rehab services. Two-thirds received rehabilitation services during hospitalization. Eight patients experienced a subsequent hospital readmission; two of those had a repeat stroke event. Although patients reported understanding their discharge instructions, their perception of ongoing care was poor. Conclusion: Key elements of a TOC model specific to the stroke and TIA patient population could include: patient surveillance, comprehensive care planning, follow-up, stroke education and point of contact. Advanced practice nurses have been successful in leading such programs, and a DNP-led model providing continuity of care would support the transition of an effective model into clinical practice.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Transient Ischemic Attack; Transitions of Care; Nursing; Stroke
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ritter, Leslie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Doctor of Nursing Practice-Led Transitions of Care Model for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attacken_US
dc.creatorHaynes, Helenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaynes, Helenaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground/Objectives: Gaps in care due to the movement of patients between health settings and/or practitioners, known as transitions of care (TOC), may contribute to second stroke or TIA events. The elements that impact TOC in the stroke/TIA population have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study is to identify key elements of a Doctor of Nursing Practice-led TOC model that could be used to develop and evaluate a TOC program for the stroke/TIA population. Design: A descriptive study was performed to 1) identify elements that may affect transitions of care using a stroke database and post-discharge phone surveys and 2) based on information from Aim 1, propose a DNP-led TOC model specific to the stroke/TIA. Setting: An urban primary stroke center in the southwest United States. Participants: All patients in the GWTG®-stroke database from May 1 - December 31st, 2012 and patients who consented at discharge from the stroke unit following a stroke or TIA. Measurements: Patient demographics including: length of stay (LOS), age, race, ethnicity, comorbidities, insurance, discharge status, thirty-day readmission rate, and follow up survey. Results: Patient data (n=276) from GWTG®-stroke database was obtained. Average LOS was 7.81 +/- 11.15 days. The majority of patients were greater than age 65 (59%); 53% relied on Medicare support; those age 50-59 (21%) were most likely to be uninsured (47%). Fifty-one percent were discharged directly home, 48% of those were referred to outpatient rehab services. Two-thirds received rehabilitation services during hospitalization. Eight patients experienced a subsequent hospital readmission; two of those had a repeat stroke event. Although patients reported understanding their discharge instructions, their perception of ongoing care was poor. Conclusion: Key elements of a TOC model specific to the stroke and TIA patient population could include: patient surveillance, comprehensive care planning, follow-up, stroke education and point of contact. Advanced practice nurses have been successful in leading such programs, and a DNP-led model providing continuity of care would support the transition of an effective model into clinical practice.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectTransient Ischemic Attacken_US
dc.subjectTransitions of Careen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRitter, Leslieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGallek, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSheppard, Kateen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDrake, Kendraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitter, Leslieen_US
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