Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques for Rodent Pulmonary Imaging

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/293388
Title:
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques for Rodent Pulmonary Imaging
Author:
Yoshimaru, Eriko Suzanne
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a safe and widely used diagnostic imaging method that allows in vivo observation of anatomy and characterization of tissues. MRI provides a method to monitor patients without invasive measures, making it suitable for both diagnostics and longitudinal monitoring of various pathologies. A notable example of this is the work carried out by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), which utilizes imaging, including multiple MRI techniques, to monitor disease progression in AD patients and evaluates treatment responses and prevention strategies. Similarly, MRI has been extensively used in evaluating diseases in a variety of animal models. In order to detect subtle anatomical changes over time, small differences in MR images must be accurately extracted. Furthermore, to ensure that the extracted differences are due to anatomical changes rather than equipment variance, it becomes essential to monitor and to assess the MRI system stability. In the first chapter of the dissertation, a method for monitoring pre-clinical MRI system performance is discussed. The technique developed during the study provides a fast and simple method to monitor pre-clinical MRI systems but also has applications for all areas of MRI. The second chapter describes the development of a 3D UTE MRI method for pulmonary imaging in freely breathing mice. The development of the 3D UTE sequence for pulmonary MRI has demonstrated its ability to collect images without noticeable motion artifacts and with appreciable signal from the lung parenchyma. Furthermore, images at two distinct respiratory phases were reconstructed from a single data set, providing functional information of the rodents' lungs. Finally, in the third chapter, 3D ¹⁹F UTE MRI is evaluated for imaging in vivo distributions of perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions for measuring pulmonary inflammation. Building upon the development of pulmonary imaging, fluorinated contrast agents made from PFCs were used to target immune cells in response to pulmonary pathology. Both 3D ¹H and ¹⁹F UTE MRI were used to acquire pulmonary images of mouse models documented to have pulmonary pathology. Even though the mice had confirmed elevation in alveolar macrophage counts, no visible ¹⁹F signal accumulation within the pulmonary tissue was observed with MRI.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Pre-clinilcal MRI; Pulmonary Imaging; Ultrashort TE; Biomedical Engineering; Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Biomedical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Trouard, Theodore

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMagnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques for Rodent Pulmonary Imagingen_US
dc.creatorYoshimaru, Eriko Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoshimaru, Eriko Suzanneen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMagnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a safe and widely used diagnostic imaging method that allows in vivo observation of anatomy and characterization of tissues. MRI provides a method to monitor patients without invasive measures, making it suitable for both diagnostics and longitudinal monitoring of various pathologies. A notable example of this is the work carried out by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), which utilizes imaging, including multiple MRI techniques, to monitor disease progression in AD patients and evaluates treatment responses and prevention strategies. Similarly, MRI has been extensively used in evaluating diseases in a variety of animal models. In order to detect subtle anatomical changes over time, small differences in MR images must be accurately extracted. Furthermore, to ensure that the extracted differences are due to anatomical changes rather than equipment variance, it becomes essential to monitor and to assess the MRI system stability. In the first chapter of the dissertation, a method for monitoring pre-clinical MRI system performance is discussed. The technique developed during the study provides a fast and simple method to monitor pre-clinical MRI systems but also has applications for all areas of MRI. The second chapter describes the development of a 3D UTE MRI method for pulmonary imaging in freely breathing mice. The development of the 3D UTE sequence for pulmonary MRI has demonstrated its ability to collect images without noticeable motion artifacts and with appreciable signal from the lung parenchyma. Furthermore, images at two distinct respiratory phases were reconstructed from a single data set, providing functional information of the rodents' lungs. Finally, in the third chapter, 3D ¹⁹F UTE MRI is evaluated for imaging in vivo distributions of perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions for measuring pulmonary inflammation. Building upon the development of pulmonary imaging, fluorinated contrast agents made from PFCs were used to target immune cells in response to pulmonary pathology. Both 3D ¹H and ¹⁹F UTE MRI were used to acquire pulmonary images of mouse models documented to have pulmonary pathology. Even though the mice had confirmed elevation in alveolar macrophage counts, no visible ¹⁹F signal accumulation within the pulmonary tissue was observed with MRI.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPre-clinilcal MRIen_US
dc.subjectPulmonary Imagingen_US
dc.subjectUltrashort TEen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTrouard, Theodoreen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBilgin, Alien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGmitro, Arthuren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPagel, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTrouard, Theodoreen_US
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