Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292953
Title:
Credit, Identity, and Resilience in the Bahamas and Barbados
Author:
Stoffle, Brent W.; Purcell,Trevor; Stoffle, Richard W; Van Vlack, Kathleen; Arnett, Kendra; Minnis, Jessica
Affiliation:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; University of South Florida; University of Arizona; College of Bahamas
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Ethnology
Abstract:
People of the Caribbean have maintained social networks that provide security in the face of human and natural perturbations. Rotating savings and credit associations (ROSCAs) constitute one such system, which probably came to much of the Caribbean with African people and persisted through slavery. As a foundation of creole economic systems throughout the Caribbean, ROSCAs are time-tested dimensions of traditional culture and a source of pride and identity. This analysis of the history and contemporary functions of ROSCAs in Barbados and the Bahamas is based on more than a thousand extensive and intensive first-person interviews and surveys. This article argues that ROSCAs continue, much as they did in the past, to provide critical human services, social stability, and a source of African-ancestor identity in these two nations. (Women’s power, rotating credit, Bahamas, Barbados).
Note:
Included with this article is a presentation produced by Dr. Brent Stoffle to highlight the findings of this paper.
Keywords:
Rotating Credit Association; Bahamas; Barbados; Identity; Community Resilience

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCredit, Identity, and Resilience in the Bahamas and Barbadosen_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Brent W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPurcell,Trevoren_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Vlack, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorArnett, Kendraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMinnis, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of South Floridaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Bahamasen_US
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherEthnologyen_US
dc.description.abstractPeople of the Caribbean have maintained social networks that provide security in the face of human and natural perturbations. Rotating savings and credit associations (ROSCAs) constitute one such system, which probably came to much of the Caribbean with African people and persisted through slavery. As a foundation of creole economic systems throughout the Caribbean, ROSCAs are time-tested dimensions of traditional culture and a source of pride and identity. This analysis of the history and contemporary functions of ROSCAs in Barbados and the Bahamas is based on more than a thousand extensive and intensive first-person interviews and surveys. This article argues that ROSCAs continue, much as they did in the past, to provide critical human services, social stability, and a source of African-ancestor identity in these two nations. (Women’s power, rotating credit, Bahamas, Barbados).en_US
dc.description.noteIncluded with this article is a presentation produced by Dr. Brent Stoffle to highlight the findings of this paper.en_US
dc.subjectRotating Credit Associationen_US
dc.subjectBahamasen_US
dc.subjectBarbadosen_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Resilienceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/292953-
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