Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292680
Title:
Traditional Ojibway Resources in the Western Great Lakes
Author:
Zedeño, M. Nieves; Stoffle, Richard, W.; Pittaluga, Fabio; Dewey -Hefley, Genevieve; Basaldú, R. Christopher; Porter, Maria
Affiliation:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
1-May-2001
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Bureau of Applied Research in Applied Anthropology
Description:
This was an applied ethnographic study of natural and cultural resources of contemporary significance for American Ojibway' tribes and Canadian Ojibway First Nations that are or were once present within or in the immediate vicinity of four National Park Service (NPS) units in the Midwest Region: Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE), Michigan; Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (PIRO), Michigan; Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (APIS), Wisconsin; and Voyageurs National Park (VOYA), Minnesota. The main objective of this study, according to the Scope of Work (SOW) of 1996, was to develop a documented basis of knowledge regarding historic and current use of resources by culturally affiliated Native American tribes that should help park managers anticipate Native American resource use issues that may confront them in the future and thus be better prepared to deal with them in an informed and culturally sensitive manner. The study also was to provide recommendations regarding preservation, monitoring, mitigation, interpretation, and use access issues. The research was designed to provide a historical and ethnographic overview and assessment of Native American, Southwestern Ojibway in particular, land and resource use as it pertains to the region where the parks are located, and to each park unit. This study also provided an inventory of ethnographic resources known to have been significant for culturally affiliated Southwestern Ojibway tribes at different points in time.
Keywords:
Ojibway; Cultural Resources; Cultural Landscapes; Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore; Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore; Apostle Islands National Lakeshore; Voyageurs National Park

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTraditional Ojibway Resources in the Western Great Lakesen_US
dc.contributor.authorZedeño, M. Nievesen_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPittaluga, Fabioen_US
dc.contributor.authorDewey -Hefley, Genevieveen_US
dc.contributor.authorBasaldú, R. Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorPorter, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued2001-05-01-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherBureau of Applied Research in Applied Anthropologyen_US
dc.descriptionThis was an applied ethnographic study of natural and cultural resources of contemporary significance for American Ojibway' tribes and Canadian Ojibway First Nations that are or were once present within or in the immediate vicinity of four National Park Service (NPS) units in the Midwest Region: Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE), Michigan; Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (PIRO), Michigan; Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (APIS), Wisconsin; and Voyageurs National Park (VOYA), Minnesota. The main objective of this study, according to the Scope of Work (SOW) of 1996, was to develop a documented basis of knowledge regarding historic and current use of resources by culturally affiliated Native American tribes that should help park managers anticipate Native American resource use issues that may confront them in the future and thus be better prepared to deal with them in an informed and culturally sensitive manner. The study also was to provide recommendations regarding preservation, monitoring, mitigation, interpretation, and use access issues. The research was designed to provide a historical and ethnographic overview and assessment of Native American, Southwestern Ojibway in particular, land and resource use as it pertains to the region where the parks are located, and to each park unit. This study also provided an inventory of ethnographic resources known to have been significant for culturally affiliated Southwestern Ojibway tribes at different points in time.en_US
dc.subjectOjibwayen_US
dc.subjectCultural Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectCultural Landscapesen_US
dc.subjectSleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshoreen_US
dc.subjectPictured Rocks National Lakeshoreen_US
dc.subjectApostle Islands National Lakeshoreen_US
dc.subjectVoyageurs National Parken_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/292680-
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