Resilience at Risk: Epistemological and Social Construction Barriers to Risk Communication

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292434
Title:
Resilience at Risk: Epistemological and Social Construction Barriers to Risk Communication
Author:
Stoffle, Richard W.; Minnis, Jessica
Affiliation:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona; College of the Bahamas
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2008
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Journal of Risk Research
Abstract:
This paper is about the persistent failure of social scientists to bring into the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process socially constructed environmental concerns held by potentially impacted communities. The failure to communicate perceived risks results from a two-communities divide based on both epistemological differences and obfuscation due to vernacular communication. The analysis provides robust modeling variables that can bridge this social-environmental divide. The case involves data collected from members of traditional communities regarding their perceptions of the potential impacts of proposed Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). The study is situated in the Bahamas where the government has approved setting aside 30 No-take MPAs to protect their sea. This analysis is based on 572 interviews conducted during eight field trips with members of six traditional settlements in the Exuma Islands and Cays in the central Bahamas. Confidence in the findings is high because the sample involves 34% of the census population of these settlements and the findings have repeatedly been returned for review and approval by the members of these settlements.
Note:
Included with the article is the conference powerpoint that served as the foundation for this paper. This paper was presented at three conferences in 2006, 2007 and 2011.
Keywords:
risk communication; social impact assessment; traditional communities of Bahamas; marine protected areas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleResilience at Risk: Epistemological and Social Construction Barriers to Risk Communicationen_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMinnis, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of the Bahamasen_US
dc.date.issued2008-01-01-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Risk Researchen_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper is about the persistent failure of social scientists to bring into the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process socially constructed environmental concerns held by potentially impacted communities. The failure to communicate perceived risks results from a two-communities divide based on both epistemological differences and obfuscation due to vernacular communication. The analysis provides robust modeling variables that can bridge this social-environmental divide. The case involves data collected from members of traditional communities regarding their perceptions of the potential impacts of proposed Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). The study is situated in the Bahamas where the government has approved setting aside 30 No-take MPAs to protect their sea. This analysis is based on 572 interviews conducted during eight field trips with members of six traditional settlements in the Exuma Islands and Cays in the central Bahamas. Confidence in the findings is high because the sample involves 34% of the census population of these settlements and the findings have repeatedly been returned for review and approval by the members of these settlements.en_US
dc.description.noteIncluded with the article is the conference powerpoint that served as the foundation for this paper. This paper was presented at three conferences in 2006, 2007 and 2011.en_US
dc.subjectrisk communicationen_US
dc.subjectsocial impact assessmenten_US
dc.subjecttraditional communities of Bahamasen_US
dc.subjectmarine protected areasen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.typepresentationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/292434-
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