If you build it, they will come: The story of the Catalina Highway.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292087
Title:
If you build it, they will come: The story of the Catalina Highway.
Author:
Taylor, Peter Mark
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The construction of the Catalina Highway began at the height of a worldwide economic depression, when a huge portion of the workforce was unemployed and capital funds were hard to come by. Federal prisoners provided most of the labor in the eighteen-year project, which began in 1933 and ended in 1951, spanning the eras of the Great Depression and World War II, periods of sustained national shortages of material and equipment. Convict labor was considered the only affordable means of constructing the road (United States Department of Commerce [USDC] 1951:13). This thesis examines the work and labor correlates represented in the material culture of the road features and the attendant prison camp that was constructed to house the workforce for the Catalina Highway project. The thesis also examines the working and living conditions of the inmates and how the inmates were perceived by the community. The thesis employs the recognized historical and archaeological methods of archival, ethnographic, and archaeological research to achieve its ends.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; History, United States.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reid, J. Jefferson

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIf you build it, they will come: The story of the Catalina Highway.en_US
dc.creatorTaylor, Peter Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Peter Marken_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe construction of the Catalina Highway began at the height of a worldwide economic depression, when a huge portion of the workforce was unemployed and capital funds were hard to come by. Federal prisoners provided most of the labor in the eighteen-year project, which began in 1933 and ended in 1951, spanning the eras of the Great Depression and World War II, periods of sustained national shortages of material and equipment. Convict labor was considered the only affordable means of constructing the road (United States Department of Commerce [USDC] 1951:13). This thesis examines the work and labor correlates represented in the material culture of the road features and the attendant prison camp that was constructed to house the workforce for the Catalina Highway project. The thesis also examines the working and living conditions of the inmates and how the inmates were perceived by the community. The thesis employs the recognized historical and archaeological methods of archival, ethnographic, and archaeological research to achieve its ends.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1427225en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b49001322en_US
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