Revolutionary representations: Gender, imperialism, and culture in the Sandinista Era.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292086
Title:
Revolutionary representations: Gender, imperialism, and culture in the Sandinista Era.
Author:
Knisely, Lisa Catherine
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis employs the critical insights of poststructuralism, postcolonial scholarship, and Third World feminisms to intervene in feminist scholarship on women and war. It is argued that gender and political violence are mutually constituted and therefore there can be no assumed relationship of women to war. This study's primary focus was to trace discursive representations of gender, violence, citizenship, and nation in Sandinista Nicaragua and the United States during the Reagan presidency. Textual analysis of three cultural areas: memoirs and testimonials, murals, and newspaper articles was used to explore dominant constructions of gender as they intersected with Sandinista nationalism and imperialist U.S. foreign policy. The process of mutual constitution of gender and political violence are then examined in the specific cases of Nicaragua and the U.S. It is concluded that discursive constructions of gender were essential to the politics of both Nicaraguan revolution and U.S. imperialism.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Women's Studies.; Political Science, International Law and Relations.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Women's Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Flinn, Caryl

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRevolutionary representations: Gender, imperialism, and culture in the Sandinista Era.en_US
dc.creatorKnisely, Lisa Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnisely, Lisa Catherineen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis employs the critical insights of poststructuralism, postcolonial scholarship, and Third World feminisms to intervene in feminist scholarship on women and war. It is argued that gender and political violence are mutually constituted and therefore there can be no assumed relationship of women to war. This study's primary focus was to trace discursive representations of gender, violence, citizenship, and nation in Sandinista Nicaragua and the United States during the Reagan presidency. Textual analysis of three cultural areas: memoirs and testimonials, murals, and newspaper articles was used to explore dominant constructions of gender as they intersected with Sandinista nationalism and imperialist U.S. foreign policy. The process of mutual constitution of gender and political violence are then examined in the specific cases of Nicaragua and the U.S. It is concluded that discursive constructions of gender were essential to the politics of both Nicaraguan revolution and U.S. imperialism.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineWomen's Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFlinn, Carylen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1427223en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b49001115en_US
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