Silencing the past: Social memory and the archaeology of the White Mountain Apache and Mormons in the Forestdale Valley, Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292085
Title:
Silencing the past: Social memory and the archaeology of the White Mountain Apache and Mormons in the Forestdale Valley, Arizona.
Author:
Jelinek, Lauren Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I use documentary evidence, oral traditions, and archaeological remains to examine a brief period of interaction between the White Mountain Apache and Mormon colonists in the Forestdale Valley. This research yields a holistic understanding of the nature of Apache and Mormon interactions in the Forestdale Valley. Archaeological evidence and oral traditions support the claim that Apache people reoccupied the homes of the Mormon colonists after their expulsion. This may have been a symbolic as well as a practical act. Shortly thereafter the settlement was burned, resulting in the erasure of the physical evidence of a Mormon occupation. The complexities of Forestdale as a symbol to both groups are revealed through the interplay of social memory and silences in the past.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reid, J. Jefferson

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSilencing the past: Social memory and the archaeology of the White Mountain Apache and Mormons in the Forestdale Valley, Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorJelinek, Lauren Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorJelinek, Lauren Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI use documentary evidence, oral traditions, and archaeological remains to examine a brief period of interaction between the White Mountain Apache and Mormon colonists in the Forestdale Valley. This research yields a holistic understanding of the nature of Apache and Mormon interactions in the Forestdale Valley. Archaeological evidence and oral traditions support the claim that Apache people reoccupied the homes of the Mormon colonists after their expulsion. This may have been a symbolic as well as a practical act. Shortly thereafter the settlement was burned, resulting in the erasure of the physical evidence of a Mormon occupation. The complexities of Forestdale as a symbol to both groups are revealed through the interplay of social memory and silences in the past.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1427222en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b49001048en_US
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