Garnering public acceptance of restoration options in midwestern ecosystems via education dissemination.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292077
Title:
Garnering public acceptance of restoration options in midwestern ecosystems via education dissemination.
Author:
Hill, Dawn Marie
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the effects of ecological information/education on perceptual evaluations of a sample of woodland sites in Midwestern USA. A computer-administered perceptual survey presented digital video images of 45 sites, ranging from relatively open savannah to dense woodland, to separate groups of college students who provided ratings of either perceived scenic beauty or acceptability (of environmental policy outcomes). Subjects in the education condition were first presented with a brief verbal and pictorial message emphasizing the history and the biological/ecological benefits of either savannah ecosystems (emphasizing the importance of "openness and open areas") or woodland ecosystems (emphasizing the importance of "protective cover and maintaining tree density"). Subjects in the non-education conditions received only general information about environmental and ecological management on public lands in the Midwest. Subjects in all conditions exhibited strong and internally consistent aesthetic and policy preferences across the 45 sites presented. There were consistently strong positive correlations between scenic beauty and policy acceptance ratings. In spite of the education manipulations intended to foster differential preferences for more open sites (savannah education) versus more dense sites (woodland education) correlations were uniformly strong and positive between savannah and woodland instructed groups, as well as between education and non-education groups for both scenic beauty and policy acceptability ratings. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Daniel, Terry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGarnering public acceptance of restoration options in midwestern ecosystems via education dissemination.en_US
dc.creatorHill, Dawn Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorHill, Dawn Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the effects of ecological information/education on perceptual evaluations of a sample of woodland sites in Midwestern USA. A computer-administered perceptual survey presented digital video images of 45 sites, ranging from relatively open savannah to dense woodland, to separate groups of college students who provided ratings of either perceived scenic beauty or acceptability (of environmental policy outcomes). Subjects in the education condition were first presented with a brief verbal and pictorial message emphasizing the history and the biological/ecological benefits of either savannah ecosystems (emphasizing the importance of "openness and open areas") or woodland ecosystems (emphasizing the importance of "protective cover and maintaining tree density"). Subjects in the non-education conditions received only general information about environmental and ecological management on public lands in the Midwest. Subjects in all conditions exhibited strong and internally consistent aesthetic and policy preferences across the 45 sites presented. There were consistently strong positive correlations between scenic beauty and policy acceptance ratings. In spite of the education manipulations intended to foster differential preferences for more open sites (savannah education) versus more dense sites (woodland education) correlations were uniformly strong and positive between savannah and woodland instructed groups, as well as between education and non-education groups for both scenic beauty and policy acceptability ratings. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDaniel, Terryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1420282en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708650en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.