Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292053
Title:
Redefining the place of work: Telecommuting and the home
Author:
Mazzi, Angela Louise, 1970-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With automation, every aspect of office work becomes streamlined, on-line, and universally accessible. This eliminates the need for a hierarchical work structure, and for spatially and temporally bounded offices. When traditional cultural constructs are abandoned through telecommunication and electronic technologies, both home and work need to be redefined. Because the workplace is being transplanted into the home, workers must establish boundaries between these two worlds to substitute for the loss of office social interaction and to balance professional and personal life. Social and architectural theories, statistics and case studies, have alternately made both dire and optimistic predictions about the repercussions of telecommuting. This thesis tests these predictions through case studies which examine how actual people are coping with this new way of working and living. It uses the resulting information to focus on the ways that home design is affected by these phenomena.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Psychology, Industrial.; Sociology, Industrial and Labor Relations.; Information Science.; Architecture.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bonnamour-Lloyd, Dominique

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRedefining the place of work: Telecommuting and the homeen_US
dc.creatorMazzi, Angela Louise, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMazzi, Angela Louise, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith automation, every aspect of office work becomes streamlined, on-line, and universally accessible. This eliminates the need for a hierarchical work structure, and for spatially and temporally bounded offices. When traditional cultural constructs are abandoned through telecommunication and electronic technologies, both home and work need to be redefined. Because the workplace is being transplanted into the home, workers must establish boundaries between these two worlds to substitute for the loss of office social interaction and to balance professional and personal life. Social and architectural theories, statistics and case studies, have alternately made both dire and optimistic predictions about the repercussions of telecommuting. This thesis tests these predictions through case studies which examine how actual people are coping with this new way of working and living. It uses the resulting information to focus on the ways that home design is affected by these phenomena.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Industrial.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Industrial and Labor Relations.en_US
dc.subjectInformation Science.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBonnamour-Lloyd, Dominiqueen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1375997en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3348501x9en_US
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