The United States census: The racialization of Indian identity and its impact on self determination

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/292017
Title:
The United States census: The racialization of Indian identity and its impact on self determination
Author:
Kline, Robyn Loretta
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Throughout the history of United States' policy towards Native people, the strongest underlying methodology for effectuating conquest has had its roots in the control of the tribal identity. Because the United States Census counts people and categorizes them into racial groups, the relationship of the identity of Native people to the Census and Federal Indian policy would seem to be closely associated. When analyzing the process of the United States Census as it applies to Native Americans, a greater understanding develops regarding the ultimate control of Indian identity and the resultant effects of that control upon tribal people. By understanding this relationship, tribes may choose to further strengthen the meaning of self determination and demand that they be the ones to count their own people. By taking control of the tribal identity, tribes are taking control of the disposition of rights and resources within the federal-tribal structure.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Law.; Political Science, General.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hershey, Robert Alan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe United States census: The racialization of Indian identity and its impact on self determinationen_US
dc.creatorKline, Robyn Lorettaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKline, Robyn Lorettaen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThroughout the history of United States' policy towards Native people, the strongest underlying methodology for effectuating conquest has had its roots in the control of the tribal identity. Because the United States Census counts people and categorizes them into racial groups, the relationship of the identity of Native people to the Census and Federal Indian policy would seem to be closely associated. When analyzing the process of the United States Census as it applies to Native Americans, a greater understanding develops regarding the ultimate control of Indian identity and the resultant effects of that control upon tribal people. By understanding this relationship, tribes may choose to further strengthen the meaning of self determination and demand that they be the ones to count their own people. By taking control of the tribal identity, tribes are taking control of the disposition of rights and resources within the federal-tribal structure.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectLaw.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHershey, Robert Alanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1403180en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4142671xen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.