Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291986
Title:
Social service use among illegal immigrants
Author:
Heinemann, Danton Lynx
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis paper researches the impact of illegal immigration on U.S. social services. The study focuses on information gathered from a group of illegal Mexican immigrants who have lived and worked in the U.S. The sample of illegal Mexican immigrants was attracted to the U.S. primarily for economic reasons. The U.S. economic system has directly and indirectly attracted Mexican workers into America for over a 100 years. The U.S. economy has directly attracted Mexican workers through recruitment practices employed by several U.S. business sectors. Indirectly, the powerful U.S. economy has historically attracted Mexicans north because the U.S.'s economy offers more economic opportunities than the Mexican economy. Illegal Mexican immigrants' presence in the U.S. economy has led to the increased use of U.S. social services and as a result of this extra use, a burden has been put on several social service institutions. To what extent this burden affects the U.S. economy is still not clear because illegal immigrants pay U.S. taxes that may compensate the system for this extra use.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political Science, General.; Sociology, Public and Social Welfare.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Latin American Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Crow, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSocial service use among illegal immigrantsen_US
dc.creatorHeinemann, Danton Lynxen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeinemann, Danton Lynxen_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis paper researches the impact of illegal immigration on U.S. social services. The study focuses on information gathered from a group of illegal Mexican immigrants who have lived and worked in the U.S. The sample of illegal Mexican immigrants was attracted to the U.S. primarily for economic reasons. The U.S. economic system has directly and indirectly attracted Mexican workers into America for over a 100 years. The U.S. economy has directly attracted Mexican workers through recruitment practices employed by several U.S. business sectors. Indirectly, the powerful U.S. economy has historically attracted Mexicans north because the U.S.'s economy offers more economic opportunities than the Mexican economy. Illegal Mexican immigrants' presence in the U.S. economy has led to the increased use of U.S. social services and as a result of this extra use, a burden has been put on several social service institutions. To what extent this burden affects the U.S. economy is still not clear because illegal immigrants pay U.S. taxes that may compensate the system for this extra use.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Public and Social Welfare.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLatin American Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCrow, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1378997en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b339524749en_US
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