Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291977
Title:
An experimental study of ground stone use-wear
Author:
O'Brien, Patrick Kevin, 1963-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis is a study of some factors that influence ground stone use-wear. Experiments in ground stone technology provide valuable information that may strengthen behavioral inference. To understand ground stone use-wear, basic principles are borrowed from tribology, the science and technology of friction, lubrication, and wear. Four wear mechanisms relevant to ground stone wear are identified: adhesive, abrasive, surface fatigue, and tribochemical. Previous experiments tested the hypothesis that use-wear on experimental grinding implements varies with the material being ground. This study further tests the same hypothesis. Six identical mano/metate sets were manufactured and used by the author to grind five different substances: dried chokecherries, wheat, crickets, dried meat, and salt. The sixth tool set was used without an intermediate substance. Results tentatively validate the hypothesis. Several factors influencing ground stone use-wear are discussed and suggestions for future experimental research in ground stone technology are offered.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schiffer, Michael B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn experimental study of ground stone use-wearen_US
dc.creatorO'Brien, Patrick Kevin, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Patrick Kevin, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a study of some factors that influence ground stone use-wear. Experiments in ground stone technology provide valuable information that may strengthen behavioral inference. To understand ground stone use-wear, basic principles are borrowed from tribology, the science and technology of friction, lubrication, and wear. Four wear mechanisms relevant to ground stone wear are identified: adhesive, abrasive, surface fatigue, and tribochemical. Previous experiments tested the hypothesis that use-wear on experimental grinding implements varies with the material being ground. This study further tests the same hypothesis. Six identical mano/metate sets were manufactured and used by the author to grind five different substances: dried chokecherries, wheat, crickets, dried meat, and salt. The sixth tool set was used without an intermediate substance. Results tentatively validate the hypothesis. Several factors influencing ground stone use-wear are discussed and suggestions for future experimental research in ground stone technology are offered.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357215en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b318627809en_US
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