Deep ecology and the environmental crisis: An anthropological inquiry into the viability of a movement

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291968
Title:
Deep ecology and the environmental crisis: An anthropological inquiry into the viability of a movement
Author:
Fox, Diana Joyce, 1965-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis explores the contemporary environmental movement termed deep ecology. Deep ecologists attempt to understand root causes of the present environmental crisis by investigating values and beliefs that Western industrial nations hold about human relationships to nature. Deep ecologists envision a future society based on egocentrism rather than an anthropocentric orientation. The lifestyles they endeavor to create and propagate are based on the belief that all living things are intrinsically valuable. Deep ecologists borrow ideas from religious traditions around the world expressing parallel notions about the value of non-human life. This thesis will investigate the contributions of two of these traditions, Taoism and Transcendentalism. The paper will also include ethnographic examples of deep ecology living derived from the field experience of the author. There will be a discussion of deep ecology's relevance to ecological anthropology, to understand the potential impacts that both disciplines can have on each other.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Henderson, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDeep ecology and the environmental crisis: An anthropological inquiry into the viability of a movementen_US
dc.creatorFox, Diana Joyce, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, Diana Joyce, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the contemporary environmental movement termed deep ecology. Deep ecologists attempt to understand root causes of the present environmental crisis by investigating values and beliefs that Western industrial nations hold about human relationships to nature. Deep ecologists envision a future society based on egocentrism rather than an anthropocentric orientation. The lifestyles they endeavor to create and propagate are based on the belief that all living things are intrinsically valuable. Deep ecologists borrow ideas from religious traditions around the world expressing parallel notions about the value of non-human life. This thesis will investigate the contributions of two of these traditions, Taoism and Transcendentalism. The paper will also include ethnographic examples of deep ecology living derived from the field experience of the author. There will be a discussion of deep ecology's relevance to ecological anthropology, to understand the potential impacts that both disciplines can have on each other.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHenderson, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest1352325en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27085363en_US
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