Conceiving American Chekhov: Nikos Psacharopoulos and the Williamstown Theatre Festival

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291967
Title:
Conceiving American Chekhov: Nikos Psacharopoulos and the Williamstown Theatre Festival
Author:
Yarnelle, David
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis examines the work of director Nikos Psacharopoulos on the plays of Anton Chekhov while Executive Director at The Williamstown Theatre Festival in Massachusetts. Components of Psacharopoulos' productions are contextualized within an American tradition of producing Chekhov and elements identified in previous research by Laurence Senelick. Using the constituents of Senelick's analysis, Psacharopoulos' work is examined in two general areas: his teaching, directing, and rehearsal techniques with the Chekhov texts, and the qualities in production of the plays at The Williamstown Theatre Festival between 1962 and 1986. This study offers, for the first time, a scholarly examination of Psacharopoulos' work and considers the director's position as an American producer of Chekhov's plays. As one of the most prolific directors of Chekhov in North America, Nikos Psacharopoulos emerges from this study as an essential component in any future consideration of Chekhov production in the United States.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Theatre Arts
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Theatre Arts
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dickey, Jerry; Hohman, Valleri Robinson

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleConceiving American Chekhov: Nikos Psacharopoulos and the Williamstown Theatre Festivalen_US
dc.creatorYarnelle, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorYarnelle, Daviden_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the work of director Nikos Psacharopoulos on the plays of Anton Chekhov while Executive Director at The Williamstown Theatre Festival in Massachusetts. Components of Psacharopoulos' productions are contextualized within an American tradition of producing Chekhov and elements identified in previous research by Laurence Senelick. Using the constituents of Senelick's analysis, Psacharopoulos' work is examined in two general areas: his teaching, directing, and rehearsal techniques with the Chekhov texts, and the qualities in production of the plays at The Williamstown Theatre Festival between 1962 and 1986. This study offers, for the first time, a scholarly examination of Psacharopoulos' work and considers the director's position as an American producer of Chekhov's plays. As one of the most prolific directors of Chekhov in North America, Nikos Psacharopoulos emerges from this study as an essential component in any future consideration of Chekhov production in the United States.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTheatre Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre Artsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDickey, Jerryen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHohman, Valleri Robinsonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1414237en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44427074en_US
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